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A new panel dataset for cross-country analyses of national systems, growth and development (CANA)

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Abstract

Missing data represent an important limitation for cross-country analyses of national systems, growth and development. This paper presents a new cross-country panel dataset with no missing value. We make use of a new method of multiple imputation that has recently been developed by Honaker and King (2010) to deal specifically with time-series cross-section data at the country-level. We apply this method to construct a large dataset containing a great number of indicators measuring six key country-specific dimensions: innovation and technological capabilities, education system and human capital, infrastructures, economic competitiveness, political-institutional factors, and social capital. The CANA panel dataset thus obtained provides a rich and complete set of 41 indicators for 134 countries in the period 1980-2008 (for a total of 3886 countryyear observations). The empirical analysis shows the reliability of the dataset and its usefulness for crosscountry analyses of national systems, growth and development. The new dataset is publicly available.

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Paper provided by Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales in its series Working Papers del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales with number 05-11.

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Length: 51 pages
Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ucm:wpaper:05-11

Note: The paper was presented at the Globelics Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 2010, at the the EMAEE Conference in Pisa, Italy, February 2011, and at the DIME Final Conference in Maastricht, the Netherlands, April 2011. A shorter version of this paper is published in the journal Innovation and Development (2011). We wish to thank conference participants and three referees of this journal for the helpful comments and suggestions. The usual disclaimers apply.
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Postal: Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales. Finca Mas Ferre Campus de Somosaguas 28223 Madrid

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Keywords: datos incompletos; métodos de imputación múltiple; sistemas nacionales de innovación; capacidades sociales; crecimiento económico y desarrollo; indicadores compuestos; Missing data; multiple imputation methods; national systems of innovation; social capabilities; economic growth and development; composite indicators.;

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References

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  1. Fulvio Castellacci, 2004. "A neo-Schumpeterian Approach to Why Growth Rates Differ," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 55(6), pages 1145-1169.
  2. Archibugi, Daniele & Coco, Alberto, 2004. "A New Indicator of Technological Capabilities for Developed and Developing Countries (ArCo)," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 629-654, April.
  3. M. Desai, S. Fukuda-Parr, C. Johansson, and F. Sagasti, 2002. "Measuring Technology Achievement of Nations and the Capacity to Participate in the Network Age," Human Development Occasional Papers (1992-2007) HDOCPA-2002-22, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
  4. Fagerberg, Jan, 1994. "Technology and International Differences in Growth Rates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 1147-75, September.
  5. Fagerberg, Jan & Verspagen, Bart, 2002. "Technology-gaps, innovation-diffusion and transformation: an evolutionary interpretation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(8-9), pages 1291-1304, December.
  6. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2010. "Closing the technology gap?," MPRA Paper 27586, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Castellacci, Fulvio & Archibugi, Daniele, 2008. "The technology clubs: The distribution of knowledge across nations," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1659-1673, December.
  8. Horton, Nicholas J. & Kleinman, Ken P., 2007. "Much Ado About Nothing: A Comparison of Missing Data Methods and Software to Fit Incomplete Data Regression Models," The American Statistician, American Statistical Association, vol. 61, pages 79-90, February.
  9. Jan Fagerberg & Martin Srholec, 2007. "National innovation systems, capabilities and economic development," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20071024, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  10. James Honaker & Gary King & Matthew Blackwell, . "Amelia II: A Program for Missing Data," Journal of Statistical Software, American Statistical Association, vol. 45(i07).
  11. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2008. "Technology clubs, technology gaps and growth trajectories," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 301-314, December.
  12. Fagerberg, Jan & Srholec, Martin & Knell, Mark, 2007. "The Competitiveness of Nations: Why Some Countries Prosper While Others Fall Behind," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1595-1620, October.
  13. Meghnad Desai & Sakiko Fukuda-Parr & Claes Johansson & Fransisco Sagasti, 2002. "Measuring the Technology Achievement of Nations and the Capacity to Participate in the Network Age," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 95-122.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Allen, Summer L. & Qaim, Matin, 2012. "Agricultural productivity and public expenditures in sub-saharan africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1173, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Chih-Chin Ho & Ching-Yang Lin & Cheng-Tao Tang, 2013. "How Do Income and Bequest Taxes Affect Income Inequality? The Role of Parental Transfers," Working Papers EMS_2013_10, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
  3. Brach, Juliane & Naudé, Wim, 2012. "International entrepreneurship and technological capabilities in the Middle East and North Africa," MERIT Working Papers 020, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  4. Wim Naudé, 2011. "Foreign Aid for Innovation: The Missing Ingredient in Private Sector Development?," Working Papers 2011/35, Maastricht School of Management.
  5. Fulvio, Castellacci & Jose Miguel, Natera, 2011. "The dynamics of national innovation systems: a panel cointegration analysis of the coevolution between innovative capability and absorptive capacity," MPRA Paper 31583, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Naudé, Wim & Szirmai, Adam & Lavopa, Alejandro, 2013. "Industrialization Lessons from BRICS: A Comparative Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7543, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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