Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Child Domestic Work

Contents:

Author Info

  • UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The fifth Innocenti Digest looks at what is probably the largest and most ignored group of child workers: child domestic workers. The limited research available on this 'invisible workforce' suggests that 90 per cent are girls, most are 12 to 17 years old, and some work 15-hour days. One of the world's oldest occupations, child domestic work is increasingly becoming a commercialized trade and in many societies child domestics are still considered 'cared for,' and not exploited. A guest commentary by Anti-Slavery International urges that in seeking solutions "nothing can be done to improve the situation of child domestic workers unless employers are involved." The Digest examines challenges for practitioners, reviews national legislation and international standards, describes the work of organizations active in the field, and provides a list of relevant readings.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/digest5e.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/digest5e.zip
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre in its series Innocenti Digest with number inndig99/17.

    as in new window
    Length: 20
    Date of creation: 1999
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ucf:inndig:inndig99/17

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Piazza SS. Annunziata, 12 50122
    Phone: +39 055 20330
    Fax: +39 055 244817
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.unicef-irc.org
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/

    Related research

    Keywords: child abuse; child workers; children's rights; domestic workers;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Akresh, Richard, 2004. "Adjusting Household Structure: School Enrollment Impacts of Child Fostering in Burkina Faso," IZA Discussion Papers 1379, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Akresh, Richard, 2005. "Risk, Network Quality, and Family Structure: Child Fostering Decisions in Burkina Faso," IZA Discussion Papers 1471, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucf:inndig:inndig99/17. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Patrizia Faustini).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.