Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

“Demand for Private Annuities and Social Security: Consequences to Individual Wealth”

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sanchez-Romero, Miguel

    ()
    (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.)

Abstract

This paper focuses on comparing public and private individual wealth over the life-cycle, when individuals face an uncertain length of life. We also analyze how a fully funded and actuarially fair Social Security affects the desire to annuitize private wealth. Within this framework, we find that a social security system can contribute to reaching a higher national wealth, even when the economy is composed of selfish individuals. Thus, by means of some simulations we obtain the result that a payroll tax of 6 percent increases individual wealth up to 17 percent. This increment, however, is obtained under the assumption that insurance companies offer fair annuities. On the contrary, under an unfair private annuity market, individual wealth can decrease around 10 percent for the same payroll tax.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.uam.es/departamentos/economicas/analecon/especifica/mimeo/wp20067.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History) in its series Working Papers in Economic Theory with number 2006/07.

as in new window
Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:200607

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Francisco Tomás y Valiente, 5, 28049 Madrid
Phone: +34.91.497.42.92
Fax: +34.91.497.69.30
Email:
Web page: http://www.uam.es/departamentos/economicas/analecon/default.html
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Actuarially Fair Funded Social Security; Crowding Out Effect; Public and Private Wealth Pro-files;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Merton, Robert C., 1971. "Optimum consumption and portfolio rules in a continuous-time model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 373-413, December.
  2. Thomas Davidoff & Jeffrey R. Brown & Peter A. Diamond, 2005. "Annuities and Individual Welfare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1573-1590, December.
  3. Luisa Fuster, 1997. "Is altruism important for understanding the long-run effects of social security?," Economics Working Papers, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra 234, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  4. Eckstein, Zvi & Eichenbaum, Martin S & Peled, Dan, 1985. "The Distribution of Wealth and Welfare in the Presence of Incomplete Annuity Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 789-806, August.
  5. Harry Markowitz, 1952. "Portfolio Selection," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, American Finance Association, vol. 7(1), pages 77-91, 03.
  6. William F. Sharpe, 1964. "Capital Asset Prices: A Theory Of Market Equilibrium Under Conditions Of Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, American Finance Association, vol. 19(3), pages 425-442, 09.
  7. Sanchez-Romero, Miguel, 2005. "“Welfare Gains and Annuities Demand”," Working Papers in Economic Theory, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History) 2005/02, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
  8. Abel, Andrew B, 1986. "Capital Accumulation and Uncertain Lifetimes with Adverse Selection," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 54(5), pages 1079-97, September.
  9. Abel, Andrew B, 1985. "Precautionary Saving and Accidental Bequests," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 777-91, September.
  10. Juan C. Conesa & Dirk Krueger, 1999. "Social Security Reform with Heterogeneous Agents," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 2(4), pages 757-795, October.
  11. Feldstein, Martin S, 1974. "Social Security, Induced Retirement, and Aggregate Capital Accumulation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 905-26, Sept./Oct.
  12. Ayse Imrohoroglu & Selahattin Imrohoroglu & Douglas H. Joines, 1999. "Social Security in an Overlapping Generations Economy with Land," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 2(3), pages 638-665, July.
  13. Tsiang, S C, 1972. "The Rationale of the Mean-Standard Deviation Analysis, Skewness Preference, and the Demand for Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 62(3), pages 354-71, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:200607. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Raúl López-Pérez).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.