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Limitations and biases of conventional analysis of climate change. Towards an analysis coherent with sustainable development

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Author Info

  • Emilio Padilla

    ()
    (Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona)

Abstract

This paper shows the numerous problems of conventional economic analysis in the evaluation of climate change mitigation policies. The article points out the many limitations, omissions, and the arbitrariness that have characterized most evaluation models applied up until now. These shortcomings, in an almost overwhelming way, have biased the result towards the recommendation of a lower aggressiveness of emission mitigation policies. Consequently, this paper questions whether these results provide an appropriate answer to the problem. Finally, various points that an analysis coherent with sustainable development should take into account are presented.

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File URL: http://www.ecap.uab.es/RePEc/doc/wp0206.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona in its series Working Papers with number wp0206.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uab:wprdea:wp0206

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Keywords: climate change; conventional analysis limitations; emissions control; evaluation of policies; sustainable development;

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