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Fiscal Federalism in Russia: A Canadian Perspective

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  • Richard Bird

    ()
    (International Tax Program, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto)

Abstract

This paper considers some of the key instrumental components of intergovernmental fiscal relations that arise in the Russian Federation -- expenditures, revenues, transfers, borrowing, and institutional arrangements -- in comparison both to Canada’s lengthy experience with federalism and to a framework developed on the basis of previous work on fiscal federalism in a variety of transitional and developing countries. Unsurprisingly, from either of these perspectives fiscal federalism in Russia seems clearly to be a work still in progress.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto in its series International Tax Program Papers with number 0409.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision: Dec 2003
Publication status: Published in Public Finance and Management, Vol. 3, No. 4 (2003)
Handle: RePEc:ttp:itpwps:0409

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Keywords: Fiscal federalism; Russia; Canada;

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References

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  1. Richard M. Bird & Francois Vaillancourt, 2005. "Changing with the Times: Success, Failure and Inertia in Canadian Federal Arrangements, 1945-2002," International Tax Program Papers 0504, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
  2. Bosquet, Benoit, 2002. "The role of natural resources in fundamental tax reform in the Russian Federation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2807, The World Bank.
  3. Bahl, Roy W. & Wallich, Christine, 1992. "Intergovernmental fiscal relations in China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 863, The World Bank.
  4. Ravallion, Martin, 2000. "Monitoring Targeting Performance When Decentralized Allocations to the Poor Are Unobserved," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 331-45, May.
  5. Eichengreen, Barry & von Hagen, Jürgen, 1995. "Fiscal Policy and Monetary Union: Federalism, Fiscal Restrictions and the No-Bailout Rule," CEPR Discussion Papers 1247, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Richard M Bird & Andrey V Tarasov, 2004. "Closing the gap: fiscal imbalances and intergovernmental transfers in developed federations," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 22(1), pages 77-102, February.
  7. Roy Bahl, 1999. "Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations in Leningrad Region," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper9902, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  8. George Kopits & J. D. Craig, 1998. "Transparency in Government Operations," IMF Occasional Papers 158, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Richard M. Bird, 2003. "Fiscal Flows, Fiscal Balance, and Fiscal Sustainability," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0302, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  10. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2002. "Asymmetric Federalism in Russia: Cure or Poison?," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0304, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  11. Richard Miller Bird, 1999. "Rethinking Subnational Taxes," IMF Working Papers 99/165, International Monetary Fund.
  12. Michael Smart, 1998. "Taxation and Deadweight Loss in a System of Intergovernmental Transfers," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 189-206, February.
  13. R Kelly, 1994. "Implementing property-tax reform in transitional countries: the experience of Albania and Poland," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 12(3), pages 319-331, June.
  14. Slack, N Enid, 1980. "Local Fiscal Response to Intergovernmental Transfers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(3), pages 364-70, August.
  15. Bird, Richard, 2010. "Taxation and Development," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 34, pages 1-5, September.
  16. Fiszbein, Ariel, 1997. "The Emergence of local capacity: Lessons from Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(7), pages 1029-1043, July.
  17. Jorge Martinez-Vasquez & Jameson Boex, 2001. "Russia's Transition to a New Federalism," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15248, October.
  18. Thomas Courchene, 1999. "Subnational Budgetary and Stabilization Policies in Canada and Australia," NBER Chapters, in: Fiscal Institutions and Fiscal Performance, pages 301-348 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Bird, Richard M. & Smart, Michael, 2002. "Intergovernmental Fiscal Transfers: International Lessons for Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 899-912, June.
  20. Richard M. Bird, 2000. "Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations: Universal Principles, Local Applications," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0002, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  21. Richard M Bird & Fran�ois Vaillancourt, 2001. "Fiscal arrangements for maintaining an effective state in Canada," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 19(2), pages 163-187, April.
  22. Bird, Richard M., 1993. "Threading the Fiscal Labyrinth: Some Issues in Fiscal Decentralization," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 46(2), pages 207-27, June.
  23. Richard Bird & Pierre Gendron, 1998. "Dual VATs and Cross-Border Trade: Two Problems, One Solution?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 429-442, July.
  24. Litwack, John M., 2002. "Central Control of Regional Budgets: Theory with Applications to Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 51-75, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Hauner, David, 2008. "Explaining Differences in Public Sector Efficiency: Evidence from Russia's Regions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 1745-1765, October.

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