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Can open sourcing lead to inferior standards?

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  • Kristian Koerselman

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Statistics, bo Akademi University)

Abstract

I investigate the effect of open source on standardization outcomes in a market with positive network externalities. In a closed source world, it seems reasonable to assume that the probability of a standard being chosen is positively correlated with its quality. Open source may weaken or invert this relationship by giving Bertrand competition losers a second chance. It however follows that though open source leads to more competition and more standardization, the chosen standard will be the same as when open source is not an option.

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File URL: http://www.ace-economics.fi/kuvat/dp027.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Aboa Centre for Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 27.

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Length: 20
Date of creation: Jan 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tkk:dpaper:dp27

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Keywords: open source software; FLOSS; standardization; network externalities; competition;

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  1. Schmidt, Klaus M. & Schnitzer, Monika, 2003. "Public Subsidies for Open Source? Some Economic Policy Issues of the Software Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 3793, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Lorenz NETT, 1993. "Mixed Oligopoly With Homogeneous Goods," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(3), pages 367-393, 07.
  3. Lerner, Josh & Tirole, Jean, 2002. "Some Simple Economics of Open," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 197-234, June.
  4. Stephen M. Maurer & Suzanne Scotchmer, 2006. "Open Source Software: The New Intellectual Property Paradigm," NBER Working Papers 12148, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Dalle, Jean-Michel & Jullien, Nicolas, 2003. "'Libre' software: turning fads into institutions?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-11, January.
  6. West, Joel, 2003. "How open is open enough?: Melding proprietary and open source platform strategies," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1259-1285, July.
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