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The worldwide economic impact of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars

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  • Kevin O'Rourke

    (Department of Economics, Trinity College)

Abstract

The years between 1793 and 1815 saw an unusually bloody, lengthy and widespread conflict between Great Britain and France, which widened to include many of the other leading powers of the day. The period is also notable for its economic warfare, which involved not only the belligerents, but several (at least initially) neutral countries, notably the young United States. This paper offers a comparative, quantitative assessment of the economic impact of the conflict.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics in its series Trinity Economics Papers with number tep9.

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Date of creation: Aug 2005
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Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep9

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  1. J Anderson & J.P. Neary, 1993. "A New Approach to Evaluating Trade Policy," CEP Discussion Papers dp0173, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1984. "Why Was British Growth So Slow During the Industrial Revolution?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(03), pages 687-712, September.
  3. Cole, Arthur H. & Crandall, Ruth, 1964. "The International Scientific Committee on Price History," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(03), pages 381-388, September.
  4. Findlay, Ronald & O'Rourke, Kevin H, 2002. "Commodity Market Integration 1500-2000," CEPR Discussion Papers 3125, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
  6. K. H. O'Rourke & J. G. Williamson, 2001. "After Columbus: Explaining the Global Trade Boom 1500-1800," CEG Working Papers 20014, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  7. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Jeffrey J. Schott & Kimberly Ann Elliott, 1990. "Economic Sanctions Reconsidered: 2nd Edition," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 82.
  8. Michael D. Bordo & Alan M. Taylor & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2003. "Globalization in Historical Perspective," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bord03-1, July.
  9. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2000. "When Did Globalization Begin?," NBER Working Papers 7632, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Hueckel, Glenn, 1973. "War and the British economy, 1793-1815 a general equilibrium analysis," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 365-396.
  11. Lovejoy, Paul E. & Richardson, David, 1995. "British Abolition and its Impact on Slave Prices Along the Atlantic Coast of Africa, 1783–1850," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(01), pages 98-119, March.
  12. Joshua L. Rosenbloom, 2002. "Path Dependence and the Origins of Cotton Textile Manufacturing in New England," NBER Working Papers 9182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Maxim Engers & Jonathan Eaton, 1999. "Sanctions: Some Simple Analytics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 409-414, May.
  14. Neal, Larry, 1991. "A Tale of Two Revolutions: International Capital Flows 1789-1819," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 57-92, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Jacks, David S., 2011. "Foreign wars, domestic markets: England, 1793–1815," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(02), pages 277-311, August.
  2. Kevin H.O'Rourke, 2006. "War and Welfare: Britain, France and the United States 1807-14," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp119, IIIS.
  3. Hasan Vergil & M. Erdem Ozgur, 2013. "American Growth and Napoleonic Wars," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(5), pages 649-666, September.

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