Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Measuring catch-up growth in malnourished populations

Contents:

Author Info

  • Kalle Hirvonen

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

Abstract

Chronic malnutrition during early childhood hinders growth and causes children to fall into a lower growth trajectory. In order to recover, children need to experience growth rates that are above the expected rate for their age. Several studies have analysed the extent of such catch-up growth by regressing adult height on early childhood height. In this paper, I show that these studies confuse catch-up growth with within-population convergence and are further plagued by a well-known statistical fallacy of regression-to-the-mean. This calls for a re-evaluation of the existing evidence. In the empirical part of the paper, I use data from the Philippines and the Kagera region in Tanzania to study catch-up growth. I find limited recovery in the Philippines cohort. In Kagera, almost 75 per cent of the children experience catch-up growth. The mean height-for-age z-score improves from -1.87 in early childhood to -1.20 by adulthood. Graphical analysis reveals that this catch-up growth takes place in puberty.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/economics/documents/wps-59-2013.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Sussex in its series Working Paper Series with number 5913.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Feb 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sus:susewp:5913

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Jubilee Building G08, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9SL
Phone: +44 (0) 1273 678889
Fax: +44 (0)1273 873715
Email:
Web page: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/economics
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: height; undernutrition; catch-up growth; children; African height puzzle;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Gorgens, Tue & Meng, Xin & Vaithianathan, Rhema, 2007. "Stunting and Selection Effects of Famine: A Case Study of the Great Chinese Famine," IZA Discussion Papers 2543, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Carlos Bozzoli & Angus Deaton & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2009. "Adult height and childhood disease," Demography, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 647-669, November.
  3. Subha Mani, 2008. "Is there Complete, Partial, or No Recovery from Childhood Malnutrition? Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2008-19, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
  4. Rouanet, Léa, 2011. "The Double African Paradox: What does selective mortality tell us?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 71, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  5. Haddad, L. & Bouis, H.E., 1989. "The Impact of Nutritional Status on Agricultural Productivity: Wage Evidence from the Philippines," Papers 97, Warwick - Development Economics Research Centre.
  6. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2004. "Long Term Consequences Of Early Childhood Malnutrition," HiCN Working Papers 09, Households in Conflict Network.
  7. Outes, Ingo & Porter, Catherine, 2013. "Catching up from early nutritional deficits? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 148-163.
  8. Fedorov, Leonid & Sahn, David E, 2005. "Socioeconomic Determinants of Children's Health in Russia: A Longitudinal Study," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(2), pages 479-500, January.
  9. Alexander Moradi, 2010. "Selective Mortality or Growth after Childhood?� What Really is Key to Understand the Puzzlingly Tall Adult Heights in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economics Series Working Papers CSAE WPS/2010-17, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  10. Suzanna Vidmar & John Carlin & Kylie Hesketh & Tim Cole, 2004. "Standardizing anthropometric measures in children and adolescents with new functions for egen," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(1), pages 50-55, March.
  11. Steckel, Richard H., 2000. "Diets versus Diseases in the Anthropometrics of Slave Children: A Reply," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(01), pages 247-259, March.
  12. Moradi, Alexander, 2010. "Nutritional status and economic development in sub-Saharan Africa, 1950-1980," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 16-29, March.
  13. Richard H. Steckel, 1995. "Stature and the Standard of Living," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1903-1940, December.
  14. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  15. Richard Akresh & Sonia Bhalotra & Marinella Leone & Una Osili, 2011. "War and Stature: Growing Up During the Nigerian Civil War," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/279, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  16. Glewwe, Paul & Jacoby, Hanan G. & King, Elizabeth M., 2001. "Early childhood nutrition and academic achievement: a longitudinal analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 345-368, September.
  17. Friedman, Milton, 1992. "Do Old Fallacies Ever Die?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 2129-32, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sus:susewp:5913. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Russell Eke).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.