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A Fiscal Stimulus with Deep Habits and Optimal Monetary Policy

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Author Info

  • Cristiano Cantore

    (University of Surrey)

  • Paul Levine

    (University of Surrey)

  • Giovanni Melina

    (University of Surrey)

  • Bo Yang

    (University of Surrey)

Abstract

A New-Keynesian model with deep habits and optimal monetary policy delivers a fiscal multiplier above one and the crowding-in effect on private consumption obtainable in a Real Business Cycle model à la Ravn et al. (2006). Optimized Taylor-type or price-level interest rate rules yield results close to optimal policy and dominate a conventional Taylor interest rate rule. Private consumption is crowded out only if the Taylor rule is sub-optimal and then negates the fiscal stimulus by responding strongly to the output gap, or if the ability to commit is absent. At the zero lower bound private consumption is always crowded in across simple rules.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Surrey in its series School of Economics Discussion Papers with number 0512.

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Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sur:surrec:0512

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Keywords: Deep habits; Optimal monetary policy; Price-level rule; Zero lower bound;

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References

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  1. Monacelli, Tommaso & Perotti, Roberto & Trigari, Antonella, 2010. "Unemployment Fiscal Multipliers," CEPR Discussion Papers 7728, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Merkl, Christian & Faia, Ester & Lechthaler, Wolfgang, 2010. "Fiscal Multipliers and the Labour Market in the Open Economy," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 37509, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  3. Morten Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2004. "Deep Habits," NBER Working Papers 10261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Valerie A. Ramey, 2011. "Can Government Purchases Stimulate the Economy?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 673-85, September.
  5. Levine, Paul & McAdam, Peter & Pearlman, Joseph G., 2007. "Quantifying and sustaining welfare gains from monetary commitment," Working Paper Series 0709, European Central Bank.
  6. Smets, Frank & Wouters, Rafael, 2007. "Shocks and Frictions in US Business Cycles: A Bayesian DSGE Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 6112, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Lawrence Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2011. "When Is the Government Spending Multiplier Large?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(1), pages 78 - 121.
  8. Alessia Campolmi & Ester Faia & Roland Winkler, 2011. "Fiscal Calculus in a New Keynesian Model with Labor Market Frictions," MNB Working Papers 2011/5, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (the central bank of Hungary).
  9. Cogan, John F. & Cwik, Tobias & Taylor, John B. & Wieland, Volker, 2010. "New Keynesian versus old Keynesian government spending multipliers," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 281-295, March.
  10. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1982. "Monopolistic Price Adjustment and Aggregate Output," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(4), pages 517-31, October.
  11. Punnoose Jacob, 2013. "Deep habits, price rigidities and the consumption response to Government spending," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2013/03, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  12. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
  13. Evi Pappa, 2009. "The Effects Of Fiscal Shocks On Employment And The Real Wage," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(1), pages 217-244, 02.
  14. Taylor, John B., 1993. "Discretion versus policy rules in practice," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 195-214, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Punnoose Jacob, 2013. "Deep Habits, Price Rigidities and the Consumption Response to Government Spending," CAMA Working Papers 2013-72, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  2. Giovanni MELINA & Stefania VILLA, 2012. "Fiscal policy and lending relationships," Center for Economic Studies - Discussion papers ces12.06, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën.
  3. Cristiano Cantore & Paul Levine & Giovanni Melina, 2013. "A Fiscal Stimulus and Jobless Recovery," IMF Working Papers 13/17, International Monetary Fund.

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