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Increasing Dominance With No Efficiency Effect

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  • Luis Cabral

Abstract

I uncover a new force towards increasing dominance. The new effect results from the strategic choice of covariance in races. I assume that players must choose not the amount of resources to spend but how to allocate those resources. I show that the laggard has an incentive to chose a different path from the leader.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 00-06.

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Date of creation: 2000
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Handle: RePEc:ste:nystbu:00-06

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Postal: New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics, 44 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10012-1126
Phone: (212) 998-0860
Fax: (212) 995-4218
Web page: http://w4.stern.nyu.edu/economics/
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References

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  1. Kyle Bagwell & Garey Ramey & Daniel F. Spulber, 1997. "Dynamic Retail Price and Investment Competition," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(2), pages 207-227, Summer.
  2. Budd, Christopher & Harris, Christopher & Vickers, John, 1993. "A Model of the Evolution of Duopoly: Does the Asymmetry between Firms Tend to Increase or Decrease?," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 543-73, July.
  3. Luis M.B. Cabral & Michael Riordan, 1992. "The Learning Curve, Market Dominance and Predatory Pricing," Papers 0039, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
  4. Ghemawat, Pankaj, 1990. "The snowball effect," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 335-351, September.
  5. Sudipto Bhattacharya and Dilip Mookherhee., 1984. "Portfolio Choice in Research and Development," Research Program in Finance Working Papers 147, University of California at Berkeley.
  6. Flaherty, M Therese, 1980. "Industry Structure and Cost-Reducing Investment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(5), pages 1187-1209, July.
  7. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 562-83, June.
  8. Arthur, W Brian, 1989. "Competing Technologies, Increasing Returns, and Lock-In by Historical Events," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(394), pages 116-31, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Axel Anderson & Luís M. B. Cabral, 2007. "Go for broke or play it safe? Dynamic competition with choice of variance," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 38(3), pages 593-609, 09.
  2. Cabral, Luís M B, 2008. "Dynamic Price Competition with Network Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 6687, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Susan Athey & Armin Schmutzler, 1999. "Innovation and the Emergence of Market Dominance," SOI - Working Papers 9906, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich.
  4. Christian Dahl Winther, 2008. "Brand popularity, endogenous leadership, and product introduction in industries with word of mouth communication," Economics Working Papers 2008-11, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
  5. Liad Wagman & Vincent Conitzer, 2012. "Choosing fair lotteries to defeat the competition," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 91-129, February.
  6. Jose Apesteguia & Ignacio Palacios-Huerta, 2008. "Psychological pressure in competitive environments: Evidence from a randomized natural experiment," Economics Working Papers 1116, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  7. Kretschmer, Tobias & Rösner, Mariana, 2010. "Increasing Dominance - the Role of Advertising, Pricing and Product Design," Discussion Papers in Business Administration 11500, University of Munich, Munich School of Management.
  8. Glazer, Amihai & Kanniainen, Vesa & Poutvaara, Panu, 2004. "Initial Luck, Status-Seeking and Snowballs Lead to Corporate Success and Failure," IZA Discussion Papers 1426, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Henkel, Joachim & Rønde, Thomas & Wagner, Marcus, 2010. "And the Winner Is--Acquired: Entrepreneurship as a Contest with Acquisition as the Prize," CEPR Discussion Papers 8147, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Zava Aydemir & Armin Schmutzler, 2002. "Acquisitions versus Entry: The Evolution of Concentration," SOI - Working Papers 0208, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich, revised Aug 2002.

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