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Participation in Adult Schooling and Its Earnings Impact in Canada

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  • Palameta, Boris
  • Zhang, Xuelin
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    Abstract

    Based on a sample drawn from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID: 1993 to 1998 and 1996 to 2001), the study finds that young (17 to 34 years old) and single workers were more likely than older (35 to 59 years old) and married and divorced workers to participate in adult schooling and to obtain a post-secondary certificate. Workers with less than a high school education who might have the greatest need to increase their human capital investment were less likely to participate in adult education than workers with high school or more education. The study shows that male workers who obtained a post-secondary certificate while staying with the same employer generally registered higher wage and earnings gains than their counterparts who did not go back to school, regardless of age and initial level of education. On the other hand, men who obtained a certificate and switched jobs generally realized no significant return to their additional education, with the exception of young men (17 to 34 years old) who would receive significant returns to a certificate, whether they switched employer or stayed with the same employer. Obtaining a certificate generated significant wage and earnings returns for older women (aged 35 to 59) who stayed with the same employer, and significant wage returns for young women who switched employers.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch in its series Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series with number 2006276e.

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    Date of creation: 24 Mar 2006
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    Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2006276e

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    Web page: http://www.statcan.gc.ca
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    Related research

    Keywords: Adult education and training; Education; training and learning; Labour; Outcomes of education; Wages; salaries and other earnings;

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    References

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    1. Jacobson, Louis S & LaLonde, Robert J & Sullivan, Daniel G, 1993. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 685-709, September.
    2. Albrecht, James & van den Berg, Gerard J & Vroman, Susan, 2004. "The knowledge lift: The Swedish adult education program that aimed to eliminate low worker skill levels," Working Paper Series, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy 2004:17, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Michael Podgursky & Paul Swaim, 1987. "Job displacement and earnings loss: Evidence from the Displaced Worker Survey," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 41(1), pages 17-29, October.
    4. Louis S. Jacobson & Robert LaLonde & Daniel G. Sullivan, 2003. "Should we teach old dogs new tricks? the impact of community college retraining on older displaced workers," Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago WP-03-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    5. Fernando Galindo-Rueda & Andrew Jenkins & Anna Vignoles & Alison Wolf, 2002. "The Determinants and Effects of Lifelong Learning," CEE Discussion Papers, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE 0019, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    6. Heckman, James J & Smith, Jeffrey A, 1999. "The Pre-programme Earnings Dip and the Determinants of Participation in a Social Programme. Implications for Simple Programme Evaluation Strategies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 313-48, July.
    7. Wooseok Ok & Peter Tergeist, 2003. "Improving Workers' Skills: Analytical Evidence and the Role of the Social Partners," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 10, OECD Publishing.
    8. Ekström, Erika, 2003. "Earnings effects of adult secondary education in Sweden," Working Paper Series, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy 2003:16, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    9. Audrey Light, 1995. "The Effects of Interrupted Schooling on Wages," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 472-502.
    10. James J. Heckman & Jeffrey A. Smith, 1999. "The Pre-Program Earnings Dip and the Determinants of Participation in a Social Program: Implications for Simple Program Evaluation Strategies," NBER Working Papers 6983, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
    12. Elchanan Cohn & John Addison, 1998. "The Economic Returns to Lifelong Learning in OECD Countries," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 253-307.
    13. Griliches, Zvi, 1980. " Schooling Interruption, Work While in School and the Returns from Schooling," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 82(2), pages 291-303.
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    Cited by:
    1. Banerjee, Rupa & Verma, Anil, 2009. "Determinants and Effects of Post-Migration Education Among New Immigrants in Canada," CLSSRN working papers, Vancouver School of Economics clsrn_admin-2009-20, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 11 Mar 2009.
    2. Ci, Wen & Galdo, José & Voia, Marcel & Worswick, Christopher, 2013. "Does adult training benefit Canadian workers?," CLSSRN working papers, Vancouver School of Economics clsrn_admin-2013-42, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 26 Sep 2013.

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