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Technology Use, Training and Plant-specific Knowledge in Manufacturing Establishments

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Author Info

  • Johnson, Joanne
  • Baldwin, John R.
  • Gray, Tara

Abstract

This study examines the factors influencing a firm's decision to train, using data taken from several recent Statistic Canada surveys that explore advanced technology use by Canadian manufacturing plants. Advanced technology adoption has been both rapid and pervasive, leading to concerns about whether technology use is associated with an increase or a decrease in workers' skills. Based on the data collected through two surveys, this paper examines the relationship between technology use and the skill level of workers. It does so by first reporting on the opinions of managers of Canadian manufacturing establishments, who indicate that technology use leads to skill increases. Second, this paper examines the relationship between a plant's decision to train and certain other characteristics of the plant, including its technology use. Third, it investigates the factors related to the location of training in order to determine whether the training done by plants imparts primarily generic skills or plant-specific skills. Finally, it reports on survey results that show plants that introduced new technologies had to increase their expenditures for training.

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File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M1995086&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch in its series Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series with number 1995086e.

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Date of creation: 30 Nov 1995
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Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:1995086e

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Postal: Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6
Web page: http://www.statcan.gc.ca
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Related research

Keywords: Adult education and training; Education; training and learning; Innovation; Job training and educational attainment; Labour; Manufacturing; Research and development; Science and technology;

References

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  1. Bartel, Ann P & Lichtenberg, Frank R, 1987. "The Comparative Advantage of Educated Workers in Implementing New Technology," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 1-11, February.
  2. Wayne Simpson, 1984. "An Econometric Analysis of Industrial Training in Canada," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(4), pages 435-451.
  3. Jeffrey H. Keefe, 1991. "Numerically controlled machine tools and worker skills," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(3), pages 503-519, April.
  4. Ann P. Bartel, 1989. "Formal Employee Training Programs and Their Impact on Labor Produc- tivity: Evidence from a Human Resources Survey," NBER Working Papers 3026, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Schrader, Stephan, 1991. "Informal technology transfer between firms: Cooperation through information trading," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 153-170, April.
  6. Johnson, Joanne & Baldwin, John R., 1995. "Human Capital Development and Innovation: The Case of Training in Small and Medium Sized Firms," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995074e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Unterschultz, James R. & Lerohl, Mel L. & Peng, Yanning & Gurung, Rajendra Kumar, 1998. "A Nutraceutical Industry: Policy Implications for Future Directions," Project Report Series 24051, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
  2. Gilberto Antonelli & Roberto Antonietti & Giovanni Guidetti, 2010. "Organizational Change, Skill Formation, Human Capital Measurement: Evidence From Italian Manufacturing Firms," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(2), pages 206-247, 04.
  3. Laia Castany, 2008. "The Role of Firm Size in Training Provision Decisions: evidence from Spain," IREA Working Papers 200808, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2008.
  4. Daria Ciriaci, 2011. "Intangible resources: the relevance of training for European firms’ innovative performance," JRC-IPTS Working Papers on Corporate R&D and Innovation 2011-06, Institute of Prospective Technological Studies, Joint Research Centre.
  5. Sabourin, David & Baldwin, John R., 1999. "L'adoption de la technologie au Canada et aux Etats-Unis," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 1998119f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.

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