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Firm Dynamics: Firm Entry and Exit in Canada, 2000 to 2008

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Author Info

  • Wang, Weimin
  • Ciobanu, Oana

Abstract

This paper examines firm entry and exit patterns in the Canadian business sector by using the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program database developed by Statistics Canada. Our primary purpose is to present stylized facts and provide descriptive analysis of the entry and exit patterns in the Canadian economy in order to form a solid foundation for future in-depth theoretical and empirical studies of firm dynamics. In particular, this paper focuses on the relative importance of entrants and exiters in terms of both number and employment, the persistence of entry and exit patterns over time, and the correlation between industry entry and exit rates.

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File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11-622-M2012022&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11-622-M2012022&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis in its series The Canadian Economy in Transition with number 2012022e.

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Date of creation: 25 Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp1e:2012022e

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Postal: Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6
Web page: http://www.statcan.gc.ca
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Related research

Keywords: Business performance and ownership; Entry; exit; mergers and growth;

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Cited by:
  1. John Baldwin & Amélie Lafrance, 2014. "Firm Turnover and Productivity Growth in Canadian Manufacturing and Services Industries, 2000 to 2007," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 173-205, June.
  2. J. Stephen Ferris, 2012. "The Relationship Between Government Size and Economic Performance with Particular Application to New Zealand," Carleton Economic Papers 12-06, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 25 Apr 2013.
  3. Don Drummond & Annette Ryan & Michael R. Veall, 2013. "Improving Canada's Productivity Performance: The Potential Contribution of Firm-level Productivity Research," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 26, pages 86-93, Fall.

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