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Relative status and satisfaction

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Author Info

  • Stefan Boes

    ()
    (Socioeconomic Institute, University of Zurich)

  • Kevin E. Staub

    ()
    (Socioeconomic Institute, University of Zurich)

  • Rainer Winkelmann

    ()
    (Socioeconomic Institute, University of Zurich)

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between income satisfaction of adult children and their relative economic status, using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel and income rank as an indicator of status. The results show that children appear to compare their actual economic status with that of their parents, deriving large satisfaction gains from an income rank that is higher than that of their parents. The effect is asymmetric with regard to parents, as these seem not to be ifluenced by their children's income rank.

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File URL: http://www.soi.uzh.ch/research/wp/2008/wp0816.pdf
File Function: first version, 2008
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich in its series SOI - Working Papers with number 0816.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in Economics Letters 109(3), pp. 168-170, 2010
Handle: RePEc:soz:wpaper:0816

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Keywords: happiness; income norm; subjective well-being;

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References

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  1. Andrew E. Clark & Nicolai Kristensen & Niels Westergård-Nielsen, 2009. "Economic Satisfaction and Income Rank in Small Neighbourhoods," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(2-3), pages 519-527, 04-05.
  2. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
  3. Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2005. "Income and well-being: an empirical analysis of the comparison income effect," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 997-1019, June.
  4. Karen E. Dynan & Enrichetta Ravina, 2007. "Increasing Income Inequality, External Habits, and Self-Reported Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 226-231, May.
  5. Easterlin, Richard A, 2001. "Income and Happiness: Towards an Unified Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(473), pages 465-84, July.
  6. McBride, Michael, 2001. "Relative-income effects on subjective well-being in the cross-section," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 251-278, July.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Martin Carree & Ingrid Verheul, 2012. "What Makes Entrepreneurs Happy? Determinants of Satisfaction Among Founders," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 371-387, April.
  2. Tobias Pfaff, 2013. "Income Comparisons, Income Adaptation, and Life Satisfaction: How Robust Are Estimates from Survey Data?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 555, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  3. Michele Sennhauser, 2009. "Why the Linear Utility Function is a Risky Choice in Discrete-Choice Experiments," SOI - Working Papers 1014, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich.
  4. Grund, Christian & Martin, Johannes, 2012. "Monetary Reference Points of Managers: An Empirical Investigation of Status Quo Preferences and Social Comparisons," IZA Discussion Papers 7097, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Pfaff, Tobias, 2013. "Income comparisons, income adaptation, and life satisfaction: How robust are estimates from survey data?," CIW Discussion Papers 5/2013, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
  6. Bille, Trine & Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld & Frey, Bruno S. & Steiner, Lasse, 2013. "Happiness in the arts—International evidence on artists’ job satisfaction," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 15-18.
  7. Polk, Andreas & Schmutzler, Armin & Müller, Adrian, 2013. "Lobbying and the Power of Multinational Firms," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79875, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  8. Roberta Distante, 2013. "Subjective Well-Being, Income and Relative Concerns in the UK," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 113(1), pages 81-105, August.
  9. Robin Samuel & Manfred Bergman & Sandra Hupka-Brunner, 2013. "The Interplay between Educational Achievement, Occupational Success, and Well-Being," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 75-96, March.

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