Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

China, the ‘East Asian Model’ and Late Development

Contents:

Author Info

  • Dic Lo

    ()
    (Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    There is an influential, neo-liberal proposition in the scholarly literature on China’s economic transformation since the late 1970s. It states that China’s reformed economic institutions are a mix of market-conforming and market-supplanting elements, that its developmental achievements so far have been ascribable to the conforming elements whereas the accumulated problems being ascribable to the supplanting elements, and that the problems have tended to outweigh the achievements as the country’s economic transition progresses from the allegedly easy phase to the difficult phase. This paper offers an alternative interpretation of the Chinese experience. The central proposition is that China’s economic institutions could be seen in favourable light both theoretically and with reference to the East Asian development experience. Specifically, the developmental implications of the market-conforming and market-supplanting elements should not be understood in any absolute sense, but rather depend on the appropriate match or otherwise between the institutions and the external environment. The developmental achievements to date indicate that China’s economic reform has managed to achieve a basically appropriate match between the two aspects, although enormous uncertainties still cloud over the future prospects owing to changes both in the external environment and the reform strategies of the state leadership.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/research/workingpapers/file28847.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK in its series Working Papers with number 131.

    as in new window
    Length: 30 pages
    Date of creation: Nov 2003
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:soa:wpaper:131

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Thornhaugh Street, London WC1H OXG
    Web page: http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: China; East Asia; late development;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Aoki, Masahiko, 1990. "Toward an Economic Model of the Japanese Firm," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 28(1), pages 1-27, March.
    2. Teece, David J, 1993. "The Dynamics of Industrial Capitalism: Perspectives on Alfred Chandler's Scale and Scope," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(1), pages 199-225, March.
    3. Dic Lo & Thomas M. H. Chan, 1998. "Machinery and China's nexus of foreign trade and economic growth," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(6), pages 733-749.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:soa:wpaper:131. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Duo QIN) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Duo QIN to update the entry or send us the correct address.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.