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Grandchild Care, Intergenerational Transfers, and Grandparents’ Labor Supply

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  • Christine Ho

    ()
    (Singapore Management University)

Abstract

One-fifth of children aged below five with employed mothers benefit from grandparent provided child care as their main source of daycare in the U.S. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we investigate how grandchild care needs relate to intergenerational transfers of time and money and grandparents’ labor supply behavior. We find that grandparents with a new born grandchild are more likely to provide grandchild care while married grandparents are also more likely to be employed and provide financial help. Grandparents with grandchildren living close by provided higher time transfers while married grandmothers with resident grandchildren also worked longer hours.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Singapore Management University, School of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 06-2013.

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Date of creation: Sep 2013
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Publication status: Published in SMU Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series
Handle: RePEc:siu:wpaper:06-2013

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Keywords: Grandchild care; Intergenerational Transfers; Grandparents’ Labor Supply;

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