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The Dynamic Demand for Part-time and Full-time Labour

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  • Friesen J.

Abstract

This paper explores the hypothesis that part-time work plays a distinct role in the adjustment strategies of firms in the face of economic shocks. Dynamic labor demand equations for part-time and full-time labor estimated from monthly data from the US Current Population Survey indicate that part-time labor is adjusted more rapidly in a number of industries. Furthermore, the adjustment of the two types of labor is not independent: disequilibrium in one slows the rate of adjustment of the other. These results lend support to the notion that part-time labor provides an important source of dynamic flexibility in some industries. Policies that reduce the relative costs of adjusting part-time labor, and changes in the economic environment that make flexibility more important to firms, may explain some of the growth in part-time employment that has taken place over the last several decades. Copyright 1997 by The London School of Economics and Political Science

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University in its series Discussion Papers with number dp91-14.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 1991
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sfu:sfudps:dp91-14

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Postal: Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada
Phone: (778)782-3508
Fax: (778)782-5944
Web page: http://www.sfu.ca/economics.html
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Postal: Working Paper Coordinator, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada
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Web: http://www.sfu.ca/economics/research/publications.html

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Keywords: economic models ; employment ; costs ; information;

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Cited by:
  1. Anxo, Dominique & Shukur, Ghazi & Hussain, Shakir, 2009. "The Demand of Part-time in European Companies: A Multilevel Modeling Approach," CAFO Working Papers 2009:8, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University.
  2. Hart, Robert A., 2006. "Real Wage Cyclicality of Female Stayers and Movers in Part-Time and Full-Time Jobs," IZA Discussion Papers 2364, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2006. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," CEPR Discussion Papers 5595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2004. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," IZA Discussion Papers 1124, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Klinger, Sabine & Wolf, Katja, 2008. "What explains changes in full-time and part-time employment in Western Germany? : a new method on an old question," IAB Discussion Paper 200807, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  6. Rob Euwals & Maurice Hogerbrugge, 2004. "Explaining the growth of part-time employment; factors of supply and demand," CPB Discussion Paper 31, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  7. Friesen, Jane, 2005. "Statutory firing costs and lay-offs in Canada," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 147-168, April.

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