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Random walks, liquidity molasses and critical response in financial markets

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  • Jean-Philippe Bouchaud

    (Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management
    CEA Saclay;)

  • Julien Kockelkoren

    (Capital Fund Management)

  • Marc Potters

    (Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management)

Abstract

Stock prices are observed to be random walks in time despite a strong, long term memory in the signs of trades (buys or sells). Lillo and Farmer have recently suggested that these correlations are compensated by opposite long ranged fluctuations in liquidity, with an otherwise permanent market impact, challenging the scenario proposed in Quantitative Finance 4, 176 (2004), where the impact is *transient*, with a power-law decay in time. The exponent of this decay is precisely tuned to a critical value, ensuring simultaneously that prices are diffusive on long time scales and that the response function is nearly constant. We provide new analysis of empirical data that confirm and make more precise our previous claims. We show that the power-law decay of the bare impact function comes both from an excess flow of limit order opposite to the market order flow, and to a systematic anti-correlation of the bid-ask motion between trades, two effects that create a `liquidity molasses' which dampens market volatility.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management in its series Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive with number 500063.

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Date of creation: Jun 2004
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Handle: RePEc:sfi:sfiwpa:500063

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References

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  1. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Yuval Gefen & Marc Potters & Matthieu Wyart, 2003. "Fluctuations and response in financial markets: the subtle nature of `random' price changes," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 0307332, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
  2. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Marc Mezard & Marc Potters, 2002. "Statistical properties of stock order books: empirical results and models," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 0203511, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
  3. J. Doyne Farmer & Laszlo Gillemot & Fabrizio Lillo & Szabolcs Mike & Anindya Sen, 2004. "What really causes large price changes?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 383-397.
  4. Lillo Fabrizio & Farmer J. Doyne, 2004. "The Long Memory of the Efficient Market," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-35, September.
  5. Parameswaran Gopikrishnan & Vasiliki Plerou & Luis A. Nunes Amaral & Martin Meyer & H. Eugene Stanley, 1999. "Scaling of the distribution of fluctuations of financial market indices," Papers cond-mat/9905305, arXiv.org.
  6. Vasiliki Plerou & Parameswaran Gopikrishnan & Xavier Gabaix & H. Eugene Stanley, 2004. "On the Origin of Power-Law Fluctuations in Stock Prices," Papers cond-mat/0403067, arXiv.org.
  7. Vasiliki Plerou & Parameswaran Gopikrishnan & Xavier Gabaix & H. Eugene Stanley, 2001. "Quantifying Stock Price Response to Demand Fluctuations," Papers cond-mat/0106657, arXiv.org.
  8. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Marc Mezard & Marc Potters, 2002. "Statistical properties of stock order books: empirical results and models," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(4), pages 251-256.
  9. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1991. " Measuring the Information Content of Stock Trades," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 179-207, March.
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  11. Eric Smith & J. Doyne Farmer & Laszlo Gillemot & Supriya Krishnamurthy, 2002. "Statistical theory of the continuous double auction," Papers cond-mat/0210475, arXiv.org.
  12. Marc Potters & Jean-Philippe Bouchaud, 2002. "More statistical properties of order books and price impact," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 0210710, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
  13. Wyart, Matthieu & Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe, 2007. "Self-referential behaviour, overreaction and conventions in financial markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 1-24, May.
  14. Potters, Marc & Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe, 2003. "More statistical properties of order books and price impact," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 324(1), pages 133-140.
  15. B. B. Mandelbrot, 2001. "Stochastic volatility, power laws and long memory," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(6), pages 558-559.
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  17. Shiller, Robert J, 1981. "Do Stock Prices Move Too Much to be Justified by Subsequent Changes in Dividends?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 421-36, June.
  18. P. Weber & B. Rosenow, 2005. "Order book approach to price impact," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 357-364.
  19. J. Doyne Farmer & Fabrizio Lillo, 2003. "On the origin of power law tails in price fluctuations," Papers cond-mat/0309416, arXiv.org, revised Jan 2004.
  20. B. LeBaron, 2001. "Stochastic volatility as a simple generator of apparent financial power laws and long memory," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(6), pages 621-631.
  21. V. Plerou & P. Gopikrishnan & L. A. N. Amaral & M. Meyer & H. E. Stanley, 1999. "Scaling of the distribution of price fluctuations of individual companies," Papers cond-mat/9907161, arXiv.org.
  22. Philipp Weber & Bernd Rosenow, 2006. "Large stock price changes: volume or liquidity?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 7-14.
  23. R. Cont, 2001. "Empirical properties of asset returns: stylized facts and statistical issues," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 223-236.
  24. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Yuval Gefen & Marc Potters & Matthieu Wyart, 2004. "Fluctuations and response in financial markets: the subtle nature of 'random' price changes," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 176-190.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Steffen Bohn, 2011. "The slippage paradox," Papers 1103.2214, arXiv.org.
  2. Chiarella, C. & Iori, G. & Perello, J., 2008. "The Impact of Heterogeneous Trading Rules on the Limit Order Book and Order Flows," Working Papers 08/04, Department of Economics, City University London.
  3. Jan Hanousek & Evzen Kocenda & Jan Novotny, 2014. "Price jumps on European stock markets," Borsa Istanbul Review, Research and Business Development Department, Borsa Istanbul, vol. 14(1), pages 10-22, March.
  4. A. Zaccaria & M. Cristelli & V. Alfi & F. Ciulla & L. Pietronero, 2009. "Asymmetric statistics of order books: The role of discreteness and evidence for strategic order placement," Papers 0906.1387, arXiv.org, revised May 2010.
  5. Szabolcs Mike & J. Doyne Farmer, 2007. "An empirical behavioral model of liquidity and volatility," Papers 0709.0159, arXiv.org.
  6. Bence Toth & Imon Palit & Fabrizio Lillo & J. Doyne Farmer, 2011. "Why is order flow so persistent?," Papers 1108.1632, arXiv.org.
  7. R\'emy Chicheportiche & Jean-Philippe Bouchaud, 2012. "The fine-structure of volatility feedback I: multi-scale self-reflexivity," Papers 1206.2153, arXiv.org, revised Sep 2013.
  8. Enzo Busseti & Fabrizio Lillo, 2012. "Calibration of optimal execution of financial transactions in the presence of transient market impact," Papers 1206.0682, arXiv.org.
  9. Khalil al Dayri & Emmanuel Bacry & Jean-Francois Muzy, 2010. "The nature of price returns during periods of high market activity," Papers 1010.4226, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2010.
  10. Steffen Bohn, 2011. "The slippage paradox," Working Papers hal-00574268, HAL.
  11. B. T�th & Z. Eisler & F. Lillo & J. Kockelkoren & J.-P. Bouchaud & J.D. Farmer, 2012. "How does the market react to your order flow?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(7), pages 1015-1024, May.
  12. Hynek Lavicka & Tomas Lichard & Jan Novotny, 2014. "Sand in the Wheels or Wheels in the Sand? Tobin Taxes and Market Crashes," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp511, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  13. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud, 2011. "Panel Statement: The endogenous dynamics of markets: price impact and feedback loops," Chapters, European Central Bank.
  14. Matthieu Wyart & Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Julien Kockelkoren & Marc Potters & Michele Vettorazzo, 2006. "Relation between Bid-Ask Spread, Impact and Volatility in Double Auction Markets," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 500067, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
  15. J. Doyne Farmer & Austin Gerig & Fabrizio Lillo & Szabolcs Mike, 2006. "Market efficiency and the long-memory of supply and demand: Is price impact variable and permanent or fixed and temporary?," Papers physics/0602015, arXiv.org.
  16. Wyart, Matthieu & Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe, 2007. "Self-referential behaviour, overreaction and conventions in financial markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 1-24, May.

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