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Access to Banking Services and Money Transfers by Mexican Immigrants

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  • Cynthia Bansak

    ()
    (Department of Economics, San Diego State University)

  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes

    ()
    (Department of Economics, San Diego State University)

Abstract

Increased access to the U.S. financial system through banks’ recognition of the ‘matrícula consular’ identification card may encourage Mexican immigrants to save and transfer more money home. Using data from the Mexican Migration Project, we examine whether immigrants with bank accounts in the U.S. between 1970 and 2002 sent more funds to Mexico than their unbanked counterparts. While having a U.S. bank account does not raise monthly remittances by Mexican immigrants, it boosts the amount brought back home by more than $6000 per trip. These findings suggest that increased usage of banks by immigrants may enhance future flows of funds to Mexico.

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File URL: http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/dept/econ/WPSeries/WorkingPaper0503.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by San Diego State University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0003.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sds:wpaper:0003

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  1. Chiuri, Maria Concetta, 2000. "Individual decisions and household demand for consumption and leisure," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 277-324, September.
  2. B. Douglas Bernheim & Daniel M. Garrett & Dean M. Maki, 1997. "Education and Saving: The Long-Term Effects of High School Financial Curriculum Mandates," Working Papers 97012, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  3. Kaivan Munshi, 2003. "Networks In The Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants In The U.S. Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(2), pages 549-599, May.
  4. Chris Carroll & Lawrence H. Summers, 1987. "Why Have Private Saving Rates in the United States and Canada Diverged?," NBER Working Papers 2319, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. David Lindstrom, 1996. "Economic opportunity in mexico and return migration from the United States," Demography, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 357-374, August.
  6. Ana M. Aizcorbe & Arthur B. Kennickell & Kevin B. Moore, 2003. "Recent changes in U.S. family finances: evidence from the 1998 and 2001 Survey of Consumer Finances," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Jan, pages 1-32.
  7. Gertrud Schrieder & Beatrice Knerr, 2000. "Labour Migration as a Social Security Mechanism for Smallholder Households in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Cameroon," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(2), pages 223-236.
  8. Brown, Richard P. C., 1997. "Estimating remittance functions for Pacific Island Migrants," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 613-626, January.
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