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Evolution of Worker-Employer Networks and Behaviors Under Alternative Non-Employment Benefits: An Agent-Based Computational Study

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  • Leigh Tesfatsion
  • Mark Pingle

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Computational Economics in its series Computing in Economics and Finance 2003 with number 7.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2003
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Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf3:7

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Keywords: Dynamic Job Search and Match Model; Agent-Based Computational Experiments;

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References

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  1. W. Bentley MacLeod & James Malcomson, 1997. "Motivation and Markets," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 339., Boston College Department of Economics.
  2. Nickell, S. & Layard, R., 1997. "Labour Market Institutions and Economic Performance," Papers 23, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
  3. Acemoglu, Daron & Shimer, Robert, 2000. "Productivity gains from unemployment insurance," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 1195-1224, June.
  4. Roth,Alvin E. & Sotomayor,Marilda A. Oliveira, 1992. "Two-Sided Matching," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521437882, Fall.
  5. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2002. "Agent-Based Computational Economics," Computational Economics 0203001, EconWPA, revised 15 Aug 2002.
  6. David MCFADZEAN & Leigh TESFATSION, 1996. "A C++ Platform For The Evolution Of Trade Networks," Economic Report 39, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
  7. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 2002. "Hysteresis in an Evolutionary Labor Market with Adaptive Search," Staff General Research Papers 10035, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  8. McFadzean, David & Stewart, Deron & Tesfatsion, Leigh S., 2001. "A Computational Laboratory for Evolutionary Trade Networks," Staff General Research Papers 2049, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  9. Joel L. Schrag, 1999. "First Impressions Matter: A Model Of Confirmatory Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 37-82, February.
  10. Alvin E. Roth, 2002. "The Economist as Engineer: Game Theory, Experimentation, and Computation as Tools for Design Economics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1341-1378, July.
  11. Leigh TESFATSION, 1995. "A Trade Network Game With Endogenous Partner Selection," Economic Report 36, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
  12. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1998. "Preferential Partner Selection in Evolutionary Labor Markets: A Study in Agent-Based Computational Economics," Staff General Research Papers 4063, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  13. Hamermesh, Daniel S., 1999. "LEEping into the future of labor economics: the research potential of linking employer and employee data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 25-41, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Simon Gemkow & Michael Neugart, 2011. "Referral hiring, endogenous social networks, and inequality: an agent-based analysis," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 703-719, October.
  2. Matteo Richiardi, 2003. "The Promises and Perils of Agent-Based Computational Economics," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 29, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
  3. John Duffy & M. Utku Unver, 2003. "Asset Price Bubbles and Crashes with Near-Zero-Intelligence Traders: Towards an Understanding of Laboratory Findings," Computational Economics 0307001, EconWPA, revised 17 Mar 2004.
  4. Richard B. Freeman, 2005. "Labour Market Institutions Without Blinders: The Debate over Flexibility and Labour Market Performance," NBER Working Papers 11286, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. James W. Boudreau, 2008. "Stratification and Growth in Agent-based Matching Markets," Working papers 2008-30, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  6. Sandra T. Silva & Jorge M. S. Valente & Aurora A. C. Teixeira, 2007. "An evolutionary model of industry dynamics and firms' institutional behavior with job search, bargaining and matching," FEP Working Papers 241, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  7. Richard Freeman, 2008. "Labor Market Institutions Around the World," CEP Discussion Papers dp0844, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Christian Martin & Michael Neugart, 2009. "Shocks and Endogenous Institutions: An Agent-based Model of Labor Market Performance in Turbulent Times," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 33(1), pages 31-46, February.

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