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Entry and Unemployment in a Union-Oligopoly Model

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  • Laurence Lasselle
  • Serge Svizzero

Abstract

It is commonly acknowledged that a larger number of trade unions is associated with a higher level of employment. We demonstrate that this belief can be wrong, i.e. that the entry of trade unions can increase the number of unemployed workers. This result is stated in a multi-sector economy in which Cournotian trade unions incur no cost and have a nominal objective function. It is obtained when the labour demand function is sufficiently convex such that the trade unions' actions become strong strategic complements. In addition, we show that this counterintuitive result is consistent with a wide range of parameter values under a CES technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Research into Industry, Enterprise, Finance and the Firm in its series CRIEFF Discussion Papers with number 9904.

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Date of creation: Oct 1999
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Handle: RePEc:san:crieff:9904

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  1. Lindbeck, Assar, 1998. "New Keynesianism and Aggregate Economic Activity," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(446), pages 167-80, January.
  2. Dixon, H. & Rankin, N., 1991. "Imperfect Competition and Macroeconomics: a Survey," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 387, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Cooper, Russell & Haltiwanger, John, 1996. "Evidence on Macroeconomic Complementarities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 78-93, February.
  4. Novshek, William, 1980. "Cournot Equilibrium with Free Entry," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 473-86, April.
  5. Rankin, Neil, 1995. "Money in Hart's model of imperfect competition," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 557-575, September.
  6. Hans Jørgen Jacobsen & Christian Schultz, 1991. "On the Effectiveness of Economic Policy when Competition is Imperfect and Expectations are Rational," Discussion Papers 91-16, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  7. Bulow, Jeremy I & Geanakoplos, John D & Klemperer, Paul D, 1985. "Multimarket Oligopoly: Strategic Substitutes and Complements," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(3), pages 488-511, June.
  8. Hart, Oliver, 1982. "A Model of Imperfect Competition with Keynesian Features," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 97(1), pages 109-38, February.
  9. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
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