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High Technology Employment and University R&D Spillovers: Evidence from US Cities

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Author Info

  • Felix Fitzroy
  • Ian Smith
  • Zoltan Acs

Abstract

Using 4 years of data from 37 American cities and 6 high technology groupings we present the first estimates of University R&D spillover effects on employment at this level of disaggregation, while controlling for prior innovations and state fixed effects. Wages and employments are strongly positively related, which can be explained in various ways. Consistent with studies showing R&D spillover effects on innovation at the state level, we find robust evidence that university R&D is a statistically significant determinant of city high technology employment and some evidence for employment effects of innovation.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Research into Industry, Enterprise, Finance and the Firm in its series CRIEFF Discussion Papers with number 9417.

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Date of creation: Oct 1994
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:san:crieff:9417

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Related research

Keywords: high technology; employment; R&D; knowledge externalities; clusters;

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Cited by:
  1. Freel, Mark S., 2003. "Sectoral patterns of small firm innovation, networking and proximity," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 751-770, May.
  2. Thomas Doring & Jan Schnellenbach, 2006. "What do we know about geographical knowledge spillovers and regional growth?: A survey of the literature," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 375-395.
  3. Lawrence A. Plummer & Zoltan J. Acs, 2004. "Penetrating the "Knowledge Filter" in Regional Economies," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2004-38, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
  4. Mattias Johansson & Merle Jacob & Tomas Hellström, 2005. "The Strength of Strong Ties: University Spin-offs and the Significance of Historical Relations," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 271-286, 07.
  5. Korres, G. & Chionis, D.P. & Staikouras, C., 2004. "Regional Systems of Innovation and Regional Policy in Europe," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(1).
  6. Schartinger, Doris & Rammer, Christian & Fischer, Manfred M. & Frohlich, Josef, 2002. "Knowledge interactions between universities and industry in Austria: sectoral patterns and determinants," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 303-328, March.
  7. Catherine Armington & Zoltan Acs, 2000. "Differences in Job Growth and Persistence in Services and Manufacturing," Working Papers 00-04, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

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