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The Employment Effect of Industry-Specific, Collectively-Bargained Minimum Wages

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  • Hanna Frings

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Abstract

This paper estimates the employment effects of industry-specific, collectively-bargained minimum wages in Germany for two occupations associated with the construction sector. I propose a truly exogenous control group in contrast to the control group design used in the literature. Further, a difference-in-differences-in-differences estimator is presented as a robustness test for occupation-specific and/or industry-specific, timevarying, unobserved heterogeneity. I do not find a significantly negative employment effect, even though the minimum wage is binding in (East) Germany. This result can be explained by substitution effects, noncompliance and models of monopsonic competition.

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File URL: http://repec.rwi-essen.de/files/REP_12_348.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen in its series Ruhr Economic Papers with number 0348.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rwi:repape:0348

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Keywords: Minimum wage; monopsonic competition; difference-in-differences;

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References

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  1. Bernhard Boockmann, 2010. "The Combined Employment Effects of Minimum Wages and Labor Market Regulation—a Meta-Analysis," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 61(Supplemen), pages 167-188.
  2. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Stephen J. Trejo, 2000. "The Demand for Hours of Labor: Direct Evidence from California," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 38-47, February.
  3. Pinoli, Sara, 2010. "Rational Expectations and the Puzzling No-Effect of the Minimum Wage," Working Paper Series 2010:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  4. Allegretto, Sylvia & Dube, Arindrajit & Reich, Michael, 2010. "Do Minimum Wages Really Reduce Teen Employment? Accounting for Heterogeneity and Selectivity in State Panel Data," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt7jq2q3j8, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  5. Lemos Sara, 2005. "Political Variables as Instruments for the Minimum Wage," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-33, December.
  6. Bauer, Thomas K. & Kluve, Jochen & Schaffner, Sandra & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2008. "Fiscal Effects of Minimum Wages: An Analysis for Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 3875, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. David Naumark & William Wascher, 2003. "Minimum wages, labor market institutions, and youth employment: a cross-national analysis," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2003-23, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  8. Dube, Andrajit & Lester, T. William & Reich, Michael, 2010. "Minimum Wage Effects Across State Borders: Estimates Using Contiguous Counties," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt86w5m90m, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  9. Addison, John T. & Blackburn, McKinley L. & Cotti, Chad D., 2009. "Do minimum wages raise employment? Evidence from the U.S. retail-trade sector," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 397-408, August.
  10. Marion König & Joachim Möller, 2009. "Impacts of minimum wages: a microdata analysis for the German construction sector," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(7), pages 716-741, November.
  11. Hirsch, Barry & Kaufman, Bruce E. & Zelenska, Tetyana, 2011. "Minimum Wage Channels of Adjustment," IZA Discussion Papers 6132, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Bachmann, Ronald & König, Marion & Schaffner, Sandra, 2012. "Lost in Transition? Minimum Wage Effects on German Construction Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 6760, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Arni, Patrick & Eichhorst, Werner & Pestel, Nico & Spermann, Alexander & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2014. "Kein Mindestlohn ohne unabhängige wissenschaftliche Evaluation," IZA Standpunkte 65, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Bredemeier, Christian & Juessen, Falko, 2012. "Minimum Wages and Female Labor Supply in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 6892, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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