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ICT and Socio-Economic Exclusion

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Author Info

  • John P. Haisken-DeNew

    ()

  • Conchita D'Ambrosia

Abstract

Using an innovative dataset for ICT use for five countries in Europe, we examine the impact and association of ICT on socio-economic exclusion. Using OLS regression we find significant wage premiums for PC and internet usage at the workplace. Following Dinardo/Fortin/Lemieux (1997), we examine the impact of ICT on the distribution of wages. We find that the risk of economic exclusion increases markedly for those not having ICT at the workplace, with the largest effects being found in Britain. To examine the impact of ICT on social exclusion, we create a multi-dimensional index of social exclusion, and also following DFL97, examine the change in the distribution of the exclusion index. Not being able to afford or knowing how to operate a home PC in Britain and Israel is associated with a large increase in the risk of social exclusion.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung in its series RWI Discussion Papers with number 0003.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rwi:dpaper:0003

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Related research

Keywords: Exclusion; Wage Differentials; Training;

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References

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  1. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Christoph M. Schmidt, 1999. "Money for Nothing and Your Chips for Free?: The Anatomy of the PC Wage Differential," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 178, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Christoph M. Schmidt, . "Inter-Industry and Inter-Region Differentials: Mechanics and Interpretation," Working Papers 9504, SELAPO Center for Human Resources.
  3. Dinardo, J.E. & Pischke, J.S., 1996. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," Working papers 96-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  4. Entorf, Horst & Kramarz, Francis, 1997. "Does unmeasured ability explain the higher wages of new technology workers?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1489-1509, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Hiroshi Ono & Madeline Zavodny, 2004. "Gender differences in information technology usage: a U.S.-Japan comparison," Working Paper 2004-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  2. Lucas Navarro, 2010. "The Impact of Internet Use on Individual Earnings in Latin America," Development Research Working Paper Series 11/2010, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.

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