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Obesity Prevention: A Review of the Interactions and Interventions, and some Policy Implications

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Author Info

  • Anura Amarasinghe

    ()
    (School of Population Health, The University of Western Australia)

  • Gerard D'Souza

    ()
    (Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University)

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    Abstract

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions especially in the developed and, more recently, in the developing world where the problem is compounded by myriad socio-economic, demographic, built and natural environmental factors. This review examines the possible causes, consequences and policy implications using a multilevel, multispectral framework. The causes of obesity clearly are multifaceted and involve numerous interactions. Together with economic incentives, allocation of physical and financial resources to community intervention strategies through educational programs as well as better land use planning would be helpful in promoting healthier and sustainable communities. Towards this goal, we proposed a dynamic and integrated Individual, Social, Economic and Environmental Model (ISEEM) for obesity prevention. The use of an ISEEM framework, involving a strategic combinations of strategies and targeted to the specific circumstances of individual communities and localities could be helpful for obesity prevention in the years to come.

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    File URL: http://rri.wvu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/wp2010-2_Amarasinghe_DSouza_Obesity.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University in its series Working Papers with number 201002.

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    Length: 38 pages
    Date of creation: 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:rri:wpaper:201002

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    Web page: http://rri.wvu.edu/research/working-papers/
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    Related research

    Keywords: health promotion; obesity prevention; dynamic; integrated system; economic incentives;

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    1. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132.
    2. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
    4. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 93-118, Summer.
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