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The Influence of Socioeconomic and Environmental Factors on Health and Obesity in Rural Appalachia

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Author Info

  • Anura Amarasinghe

    (Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University)

  • Gerard D'Souza

    ()
    (Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University)

  • Cheryl Brown

    ()
    (Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University)

  • Hyungna Oh
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    A recursive system of ordered self assessed health (SAH) and a binary indicator of obesity were used to investigate the impact of socioeconomic and environmental factors on health and obesity in the predominantly rural Appalachian state of West Virginia. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data together with county specific socioeconomic and built environment indicators were used in estimation. Results indicate that an individual’s risk of being obese increases at a decreasing rate with per capita income and age. Marginal impacts show that as the level of education attainment increases, the probability of being obese decreases by 3%. Physical inactivity increases the risk of being obese by 9%, while smoking reduces the risk of being obese by 14%. Fruit and vegetable consumption lowers the probability of being obese by 2%, while each hour increase in commuting time raises the probability of being obese by 2.4%. In addition, individuals living in economically distressed counties are less likely to have good health. Intervention measures which stimulate human capital development and better land use planning are essential policy elements to improving health and reducing the incidence of obesity in rural Appalachia.

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    File URL: http://rri.wvu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/wp2006-12.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University in its series Working Papers with number 200612.

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    Length: 33 pages
    Date of creation: 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:rri:wpaper:200612

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    Phone: 304 293 2896
    Fax: 304 293 6699
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    Web page: http://rri.wvu.edu/research/working-papers/
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    Keywords: health; obesity; human capital; land use; rural;

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    References

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    1. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1982. "Health and Wage: A Simultaneous Equation Model with Multiple Discrete Indicators," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 23(1), pages 199-221, February.
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