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Behavioral economics, neuroeconomics, and climate change policy: baseline review for the garrison institute initiative on climate change

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  • John M. Gowdy

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY 12180-3590, USA)

Abstract

In spite of the increasing scientific certainty that the earth's climate is warming and that human activity is partially responsible, public willingness to take steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions seems to be decreasing. How can the scientific consensus as to the urgency of the climate change problem be conveyed to the general public in such a way as to support greenhouse gas abatement policies and to actually change behavior? This essay explores the standard economic approach to environmental pollution and discusses findings from behavioral economics and neuroscience that could lead to a more fruitful understanding of the relationship between economic policy and human psychology. This essay is a background paper prepared for the Garrison Institute's "Climate, Mind and Behavior" initiative.

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Paper provided by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics in its series Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics with number 1010.

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Date of creation: Nov 2010
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Handle: RePEc:rpi:rpiwpe:1010

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