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Promoting Competition in Telecommunications

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Author Info

  • Stiglitz, Joseph

    (The World Bank)

Abstract

There is a growing recognition of the importance of competition for the success of market economies, and of the need for government action both to maintain competition and to regulate industries where competition remains limited. In the area of telecommunications, upon which I shall focus today, we have seen examples where privatization has not delivered on its promises: in some cases access in certain vital areas has actually been reduced. Competition and regulatory policy are vital for a market economy. The fundamental theorems of welfare economics, assume that both private property and competitive markets exist in the economy. Until recently, however, emphasis was placed almost exclusively on creating private property, and privatization of public assets. A well designed privatization, where there is a good regulatory framework in place, can raise enormous revenues and at the same time increase services and lower prices.

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File URL: http://www.uade.edu.ar/DocsDownload/Publicaciones/4_228_1616_WPS002_1999.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Instituto de Economía, Universidad Argentina de la Empresa in its series UADE Working Papers with number 2_1999.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 01 Mar 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ris:uadewp:1999_002

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Web page: http://www.uade.edu.ar/paginas/InstEconomiaIDE.aspx
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Related research

Keywords: market economies; government; competition; regulate industries; telecommunications;

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Cited by:
  1. Wallsten, Scott, 2002. "Does sequencing matter? regulation and privatization in telecommunications reforms," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2817, The World Bank.
  2. M'HENNI, Hatem, 2004. "La fracture numérique Nord-Sud de la méditerranée; une explication néo-institutionnelle
    [A digital divide between north and south of Mediterranean sea: A neo-institutional explanation]
    ," MPRA Paper 27548, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Scott Wallsten, 2003. "Of Carts and Horses: Regulation and Privatization in Telecommunications Reforms," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(4), pages 217-231.

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