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The Russian default and the contagion to Brazil

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  • Taimur Baig

    ()

  • Ilan Goldfajn

    ()
    (Department of Economics PUC-Rio)

Abstract

This paper investigates the contagion from Russia to Brazil in late 1998 under two dimensions players involved and the timing of events. The data does not seem to reflect a compensatory liquidation of assets story by international institutional investors. It does contribute, however, to the suspicion that the contagion was triggered by foreign investors panicking from the Russian crisis, and joining local residents on their speculation against the Brazilian real. Adjusted correlations in the Brady market increase significantly during the crisis, which lends support to the view that if there was a contagion from Russia to Brazil, the most likely place of the transmission was the off-shore Brady market. Finally, the paper does not support the hypothesis that it was the liquidity crisis in mature markets, and not the Russian crisis, that timed the crisis in Brazil.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil) in its series Textos para discussão with number 420.

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Length: 49 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2000
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Stijn Claessens; Kristin Forbes. International Financial Contagion. Kluwer Academic Publishers, p. 268-299, 2001
Handle: RePEc:rio:texdis:420

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References

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  1. Pierre-Richard Agenor & Joshua Aizenman, 1997. "Contagion and Volatility with Imperfect Credit Markets," NBER Working Papers 6080, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Menzie D. Chinn, 1998. "Before the Fall: Were East Asian Currencies Overvalued?," NBER Working Papers 6491, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Ilan Goldfajn & Taimur Baig, 1999. "Financial market contagion in the Asian crisis," Textos para discussão 400, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Saleem, Kashif, 2008. "International linkage of the Russian market and the Russian financial crisis: A multivariate GARCH analysis," BOFIT Discussion Papers 8/2008, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  2. Sandra Lizarazo, 2009. "Contagion of Financial Crises in Sovereing Debt Markets," Working Papers 0906, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
  3. Mardi Dungey & Renee Fry & Brenda Gonzales-Hermosillo & Vance L. Martin, 2005. "Shocks And Systemic Influences: Contagion In Global Equity Markets In 1998," CAMA Working Papers 2005-15, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  4. Baur, Dirk & Schulze, Niels, 2005. "Coexceedances in financial markets--a quantile regression analysis of contagion," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-43, April.
  5. MARAIS Elise, 2004. "La contagion financi`ere : une ´etude empirique sur les causalités lors de la crise asiatique," International Finance 0404003, EconWPA.
  6. Mardi Dungey & Renée Fry & Vance L. Martin, 2006. "Correlation, Contagion, and Asian Evidence," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 5(2), pages 32-72, June.
  7. Axel Schimmelpfennig & E. H. Gardner, 2008. "Lebanon-Weathering the Perfect Storms," IMF Working Papers 08/17, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Anis Omri & Mohamed Frikha, 2011. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence During the US Sub-Primes Crisis," Transition Studies Review, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 286-298, December.
  9. Thomas D. Willett & Aida Budiman & Arthur Denzau & Gab-Je Jo & Cesar Ramos & John Thomas, 2001. "The Falsification of Four Popular Hypotheses about International Financial Behavior during the Asian Crisis," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-06, Claremont Colleges, revised Sep 2001.

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