Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The Economics & Politics of Climate Change

Contents:

Author Info

  • Hahn, Robert W.

Abstract

A fundamental issue is what steps, if any, countries should take to control greenhouse gas emissions. The economics literature generally suggests that there is no reason to panic and take drastic action now to reduce greenhouse gases. The political economy literature suggests that such action is infeasible because of the serious problems in getting countries to cooperate. This volume argues that the best strategy for addressing climate change over the next decade is to help build institutions that can address climate change in the future. Those institutions include systems established at the nation-state level to measure greenhouse gas emissions, to implement cost-effective approaches for limiting those emissions, and to enforce those approaches. Over time, supervising the achievement of those objectives might evolve so that it would come under the jurisdiction of an international body, although sovereignty issues would have to be addressed. That international body would assess greenhouse gas inventories and review national policies and measures. This study recommends that the developed nations of the world craft an agreement for the next decade that provides a slight emission limitation and allows for a series of case studies. The case studies would allow for the participation of developing countries. The case-study approach would take into account the interests of particular countries. For example, the Scandinavian countries, which have already implemented carbon taxes, could continue on that path, perhaps working on harmonization issues. The United States and other countries interested in tradable permits or a hybrid system could use that approach. Other European countries may want to try a combination of regulation and market-based approaches. The case studies suggested in this volume underscore the need to design national institutions. Such national institutions are crucial if novel market-based mechanisms are to be implemented effectively. The appeal of the case-study approach is that it preserves diversity and builds useful institutional experience and knowledge. The last thing we should be doing now, in our state of ignorance about the warming problem and institutional responses, is to narrow the range of response mechanisms. Thus, the case studies cover a fairly wide range but focus on the development of cost-effective approaches for limiting greenhouse gas emissions.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://regulation2point0.org/wp-content/plugins/download-monitor/download.php?id=610
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Regulation2point0 in its series Working paper with number 610.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Jan 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:reg:wpaper:610

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://regulation2point0.org/

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Warwick J. McKibbin & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 1997. "A Better Way to Slow Global Climate Change," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 9702, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
  2. Barrett, Scott, 1997. "The strategy of trade sanctions in international environmental agreements," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 345-361, November.
  3. Chichilnisky, G. & Heal, G., 1993. "Global Environmental Risks," Discussion Papers 1993_03, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  4. Joaquim Oliveira Martins & Jean-Marc Burniaux & John P. Martin & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 1992. "The Costs of Reducing CO2 Emissions: A Comparison of Carbon Tax Curves with GREEN," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 118, OECD Publishing.
  5. Henry D. Jacoby & Richard S. Eckaus & A. Denny Ellerman & Ronald G. Prinn & David M. Reiner & Zili Yang, 1997. "CO2 Emissions Limits: Economic Adjustments and the Distribution of Burdens," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 31-58.
  6. Lester B. Lave, 1987. "The greenhouse effect: What government actions are needed?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(3), pages 460-470.
  7. Ian W. H. Parry & Roberton C. Williams III & Lawrence H. Goulder, 1997. "When Can Carbon Abatement Policies Increase Welfare? The Fundamental Role of Distorted Factor Markets," NBER Working Papers 5967, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Arrow, Kenneth J. & Cropper, Maureen L. & Eads, George C. & Hahn, Robert W. & Lave, Lester B. & Noll, Roger G. & Portney, Paul R. & Russell, Milton & Schmalensee, Richard L. & Smith, V. Kerry & Stavin, 1996. "Benefit-Cost Analysis in Environmental, Health, and Safety Regulation: A Statement of Principles," Working paper 615, Regulation2point0.
  9. Dale W. Jorgenson & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 1990. "Environmental Regulation and U.S. Economic Growth," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 21(2), pages 314-340, Summer.
  10. Burtraw, Dallas & Toman, Michael, 1997. "The Benefits of Reduced Air Pollutants in the U.S. from Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Policies," Discussion Papers dp-98-01-rev, Resources For the Future.
  11. Andrew Dean & Peter Hoeller, 1992. "Costs of Reducing CO2 Emissions: Evidence from Six Global Models," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 122, OECD Publishing.
  12. Kolstad, Charles D., 1994. "George Bush versus Al Gore : Irreversibilities in greenhouse gas accumulation and emission control investment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 771-778, September.
  13. Cornell, N. & Noll, Roger G. & Weingast, B., . "Safety Regulation," Working Papers 122, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:reg:wpaper:610. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Archive Maintainer).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.