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Asset Liquidity and International Portfolio Choice

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  • Ina Simonovska

    (University of California, Davis)

  • Athanasios Geromichalos

    (University of California, Davis)

Abstract

We study optimal asset portfolio choice in a two-country search-theoretic model of monetary exchange. We allow assets to not only represent claims on future consumption, but to also serve as means of payment. Assuming foreign assets trade at a cost, we characterize equilibria in which different countries’ assets arise as media of exchange in different types of trades. More frequent trading opportunities at home result in agents holding proportionately more domestic over foreign assets. Consequently, agents have larger claims to domestic over foreign consumption goods. Moreover, foreign assets turn over faster than home assets because the former have desirable liquidity properties, but unfavorable returns over time. Our mechanism offers an answer to a long-standing puzzle in international finance: a positive relationship between consumption and asset home bias, coupled with higher turnover rates of foreign over domestic assets.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2011 Meeting Papers with number 756.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed011:756

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References

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  1. Fabrice Collard & Harris Dellas & Behzad Diba & Alan Stockman, 2009. "Goods Trade and International Equity Portfolios," School of Economics Working Papers 2009-14, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  2. Allen Head & Shouyong Shi, 2002. "A Fundamental Theory of Exchange Rates and Direct Currency Trades," Working Papers shouyong-03-01, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  3. Athanasios Geromichalos & Juan M Licari & Jose Suarez-Lledo, 2007. "Monetary Policy and Asset Prices," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(4), pages 761-779, October.
  4. Benjamin Lester & Andrew Postlewaite & Randall Wright, 2008. "Information, Liquidity and Asset Prices," PIER Working Paper Archive 08-039, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  5. Hnatkovska, Viktoria, 2010. "Home bias and high turnover: Dynamic portfolio choice with incomplete markets," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 113-128, January.
  6. Kiminori Matsuyama, 1991. "Toward a Theory of International Currency," Discussion Papers 931, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  7. Fabrizio Perri & Jonathan Heathcote, 2007. "The International Diversification Puzzle Is Not as Bad as You Think," Working Papers 2007-3, University of Minnesota, Department of Economics, revised 08 Oct 2007.
  8. Camera, Gabriele & Winkler, Johannes, 2003. "International monetary trade and the law of one price," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(7), pages 1531-1553, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Andrew K. Rose & Mark M. Spiegel, 2011. "Dollar Illiquidity and Central Bank Swap Arrangements During the Global Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 17359, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Athanasios Geromichalos & Lucas Herrenbrueck & Kevin Salyer, 2013. "A Search-Theoretic Model of the Term Premium," Working Papers 138, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  3. Martin Meier & Burkhard Schipper, 2013. "Bayesian Games with Unawareness and Unawareness Perfection," Working Papers 139, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.

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