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More Potent Monetary Policy? Insights from a Threshold Model

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  • Jarkko Jääskelä

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

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    Abstract

    It has been argued that the effect of a change in the monetary policy interest rate on aggregate demand may be larger at higher levels of indebtedness through its impact on cash flows. However, the extent of credit constraints may be at least as important, if not more so. In particular, monetary policy could have a larger impact on aggregate demand when credit constraints are pervasive (which could be the case at low or high levels of indebtedness, or both). This paper examines the extent to which the strength of credit growth, which can be seen as a proxy for credit constraints, may affect the transmission of monetary policy in a way that cannot be captured in linear models. The results reveal that GDP growth is more responsive to interest rate shocks when credit growth is low. Separate models for household and business credit growth confirm this finding: consumption and business investment are more responsive to interest rate shocks when credit is growing slowly for the household and business sectors, respectively.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Reserve Bank of Australia in its series RBA Research Discussion Papers with number rdp2007-07.

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    Date of creation: Jul 2007
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    Handle: RePEc:rba:rbardp:rdp2007-07

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    Keywords: monetary policy; business-cycle asymmetries; threshold models;

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    1. Lanne, M. & Saikkonen, P., 2000. "Threshold Autoregression for Strongly Autocorrelated Time Series," University of Helsinki, Department of Economics 489, Department of Economics.
    2. M Sensier & D R Osborn & N Öcal, 2002. "Asymmetric Interest Rate Effects for the UK Real Economy," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 10, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    3. Azariadis, Costas & Smith, Bruce, 1998. "Financial Intermediation and Regime Switching in Business Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 516-36, June.
    4. Koop, Gary & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Potter, Simon M., 1996. "Impulse response analysis in nonlinear multivariate models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 119-147, September.
    5. Weise, Charles L, 1999. "The Asymmetric Effects of Monetary Policy: A Nonlinear Vector Autoregression Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(1), pages 85-108, February.
    6. Ellis W. Tallman & Nargis Bharucha, 2000. "Credit crunch or what? Australian banks during the 1986–93 credit cycle," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q3, pages 13-34.
    7. Ming Chien Lo & Jeremy Piger, 2003. "Is the response of output to monetary policy asymmetric? evidence from a regime-switching coefficients model," Working Papers 2001-022, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    8. Tomoya Suzuki, 2004. "Is the Lending Channel of Monetary Policy Dominant in Australia?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(249), pages 145-156, 06.
    9. Peersman, Gert & Smets, Frank, 2001. "Are the effects of monetary policy in the euro area greater in recessions than in booms?," Working Paper Series 0052, European Central Bank.
    10. Nathan S. Balke, 2000. "Credit and Economic Activity: Credit Regimes and Nonlinear Propagation of Shocks," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(2), pages 344-349, May.
    11. Alan S. Blinder, 1985. "Credit Rationing and Effective Supply Failures," NBER Working Papers 1619, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Leon Berkelmans, 2005. "Credit and Monetary Policy: An Australian SVAR," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2005-06, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    13. Cover, James Peery, 1992. "Asymmetric Effects of Positive and Negative Money-Supply Shocks," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1261-82, November.
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