Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Neighborhoods, Poverty and Children's Well-being: A Review

Contents:

Author Info

  • Anne R. Pebley
  • Narayan Sastry
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    In this paper, we examine recent research in the area of neighborhood effects on children's development. We begin by reviewing the literature on the mechanisms through which neighborhoods may influence child development. Then we consider four issues which are fundamental to neighborhood effects research: (1) the definition of "neighborhood," (2) which aspects of neighborhood environments are important and how they should be measured, (3) neighborhood selection, and (4) children's residential mobility. Next, we assess recent empirical work on neighborhood effects. Recent reviews by Sampson et al. (2002), Ginter et al. (2000), Duncan and Raudenbush (1999, 2000), and Leventhal and Brooks-Gunn (2000) catalog studies since 1990 and provide thorough reviews of their results. Rather than duplicate their efforts, we briefly summarize and compare their conclusions and then focus on the results of selected studies which provide novel approaches or insights. The final section of the paper summarizes the current state of knowledge about poor neighborhoods and their role in the intergenerational transmission of poverty.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/drafts/2006/DRU3001.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by RAND Corporation Publications Department in its series Working Papers with number 03-04.

    as in new window
    Length: 48 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2003
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:03-04

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1776 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, California 90407-2138
    Phone: 310-393-0411
    Fax: 310-393-4818
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.rand.org/pubs/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Edward Gramlich & Deborah Laren & Naomi Sealand, 1992. "Moving into and out of poor urban areas," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 273-287.
    2. Daniel Aaronson, 1998. "Using Sibling Data to Estimate the Impact of Neighborhoods on Children's Educational Outcomes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(4), pages 915-946.
    3. Lawrence F. Katz & Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 2000. "Moving to Opportunity in Boston: Early Results of a Randomized Mobility Experiment," NBER Working Papers 7973, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Case, A.C. & Katz, L.F., 1991. "The Company You Keep: The Effects Of Family And Neighborhood On Disadvantaged Younths," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1555, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    5. R. D. Plotnick & S. D. Hoffman, . "The Effect of Neighborhood Characteristics on Young Adult Outcomes: Alternative Estimates," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1106-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    6. Evans, William N & Oates, Wallace E & Schwab, Robert M, 1992. "Measuring Peer Group Effects: A Study of Teenage Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 966-91, October.
    7. Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey B. Liebman & Lawrence F. Katz, 2001. "Bullets Don’t Got No Name: Consequences of Fear in the Ghetto," Working Papers 274, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
    8. Chamberlain, Gary, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 225-38, January.
    9. Donna Ginther & Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 2000. "Neighborhood Attributes as Determinants of Children's Outcomes: How Robust Are the Relationships?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(4), pages 603-642.
    10. Gary Solon & Marianne E. Page & Greg J. Duncan, 2000. "Correlations Between Neighboring Children In Their Subsequent Educational Attainment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 383-392, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:03-04. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Benson Wong).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.