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The Availability of Child Care Centers in China and Its Impact on Child Care and Maternal Work Decisions

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  • M. Rebecca Kilburn
  • Ashlesha Datar
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    Abstract

    While the use of child care and mothers' labor force participation are often described as being related to the availability of center-based child care, there is little empirical evidence documenting this relationship. This paper examines the role of center availability in child care use and mother's participation in wage labor using the China Health and Nutrition Survey. Our difference-in-difference estimates suggest that the availability of child care centers in China is associated with sizeable increases in both child care utilization and women's wage labor in urban areas. Our results also demonstrate the importance for non-random center availability.

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    File URL: http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/drafts/2008/DRU2924.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by RAND Corporation Publications Department in its series Working Papers with number 02-12.

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    Length: 50 pages
    Date of creation: Dec 2002
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:02-12

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    1. Suzanne Bianchi, 2000. "Maternal employment and time with children: Dramatic change or surprising continuity?," Demography, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 401-414, November.
    2. Ribar, D.C., 1991. "A Structural Model of Child Care and the Labor Supply of Married Women," Papers 1-91-1, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
    3. Blau, Francine D & Grossberg, Adam J, 1992. "Maternal Labor Supply and Children's Cognitive Development," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(3), pages 474-81, August.
    4. Jonathan Gruber & James M. Poterba, 1996. "Tax Incentives and the Decision to Purchase Health Insurance: Evidence from the Self-Employed," NBER Working Papers 4435, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Gruber, Jonathan, 1994. "The Incidence of Mandated Maternity Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 622-41, June.
    6. David M. Blau & Alison P. Hagy, 1998. "The Demand for Quality in Child Care," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(1), pages 104-146, February.
    7. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1986. "Evaluating the Effects of Optimally Distributed Public Programs: ChildHealth and Family Planning Interventions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 470-82, June.
    8. Connelly, Rachel, 1992. "The Effect of Child Care Costs on Married Women's Labor Force Participation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 83-90, February.
    9. Rachel Gordon & P. Chase-Lansdale, 2001. "Availability of child care in the United States: A description and analysis of data sources," Demography, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 299-316, May.
    10. Blau, David M & Robins, Philip K, 1988. "Child-Care Costs and Family Labor Supply," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(3), pages 374-81, August.
    11. Rachel Connelly, 1992. "Self-employment and providing child care," Demography, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 17-29, February.
    12. Connelly, Rachel & DeGraff, Deborah S & Levison, Deborah, 1996. "Women's Employment and Child Care in Brazil," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(3), pages 619-56, April.
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    Cited by:
    1. Fuhua Zhai & Qin Gao, 2010. "Center-Based Care in the Context of One-Child Policy in China: Do Child Gender and Siblings Matter?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 29(5), pages 745-774, October.

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