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Persistent, Consistent, and Widespread?: Another Look at Recent Trends in Old-Age Disability

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  • Robert F. Schoeni
  • Vicki A. Freedman
  • Robert B. Wallace

Abstract

This study provides new evidence on trends in disability among the elderly from 1982 to 1996. Logistics analysis is used to estimate the trend in disability prevalence after controlling for age, sex, and proxy reporting. The sample includes 124,949 people ages 70 and older in the 1982-1996 National Interview Surveys. The authors find that i) disability has improved, but the gains did not persist throughout the entire period or accelerate over time; ii) only routine care disability has declined, whereas more severe personal care disability shows no improvements; iii) estimates are robust to the exclusion of the nursing home population but may be sensitive to growth in the assisted living population; iv) estimates of decline in disability prevalence are fairly consistent across five national surveys, v) gains have been concentrated among the most educated elderly, and vi) gains in the educational composition can explain 65 percent of the improvements.

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File URL: http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/drafts/2008/DRU2352.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by RAND Corporation Publications Department in its series Working Papers with number 00-13.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:00-13

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Keywords: HEALTH ; AGE ; EDUCATION;

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References

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  1. Timothy Waidmann & John Bound & Michael Schoenbaum, 1995. "The Illusion of Failure: Trends in the Self-Reported Health of the U.S. Elderly," NBER Working Papers 5017, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Julie Zissimopoulos, 2001. "Resource Transfers to the Elderly: Do Adult Children Substitute Financial Transfers for Time Transfers?," Working Papers 01-05, RAND Corporation Publications Department.

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