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Gender and other determinants of trust and reciprocity in an experimental labour market amongst Chinese students

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  • Uwe Dulleck
  • Jonas Fooken
  • Yumei He

Abstract

Due to economic and demographic changes highly educated women play an important role on the Chinese labour market. Gender has been shown to be an important characteristic that influences behaviour in economic experiments, as have, to a lesser degree, academic major, age and income. We provide a study looking at trust and reciprocity and their determinants in a labour market laboratory experiment. Our experimental data is based on two games, the Gift Exchange Game (GEG) and a variant of this game (the Wage Promising Game, WPG) where the employer's wage off er is non-binding and the employer can choose the wage freely after observing the workers e ffort. We find that women are less trusting and reciprocal than men in the GEG while this cannot be found in the WPG. Letting participants play the GEG and the WPG, allows us to disentangle reciprocal and risk attitudes. While in the employer role, it seems to be that risk attitude is the main factor, this is not con firmed analysing decisions in the worker role.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by QUT Business School in its series QuBE Working Papers with number 012.

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Date of creation: 01 May 2013
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Handle: RePEc:qut:qubewp:wp012

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Web page: http://www.qut.edu.au/research/research-projects/queensland-behavioural-economics-group-qube

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  14. Buchan, Nancy R. & Croson, Rachel T.A. & Solnick, Sara, 2008. "Trust and gender: An examination of behavior and beliefs in the Investment Game," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(3-4), pages 466-476, December.
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