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Does The John Bates Clark Medal Boost Subsequent Productivity And Citation Success?

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  • Ho Fai Chan
  • Bruno S. Frey
  • Jana Gallus
  • Benno Torgler

Abstract

Despite the social importance of awards, they have been largely disregarded by academic research in economics. This paper investigates whether a specific, yet important, award in economics, the John Bates Clark Medal, raises recipients' subsequent research activity and status compared to a synthetic control group of nonrecipient scholars with similar previous research performance. We find evidence of positive incentive and status effects that raise both productivity and citation levels.

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File URL: http://external-apps.qut.edu.au/business/documents/QuBEWorkingPapers/2013/20130225_JBC_WorkingPaperVersion.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by QUT Business School in its series QuBE Working Papers with number 004.

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Date of creation: 14 Mar 2013
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Handle: RePEc:qut:qubewp:wp004

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Web page: http://www.qut.edu.au/research/research-projects/queensland-behavioural-economics-group-qube

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Keywords: Awards; Incentives; Research; John Bates Clark Medal; Synthetic control method;

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Recognition stimulates productivity: no surprises there!
    by Nicholas Gruen in Club Troppo on 2013-02-17 07:38:20
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Cited by:
  1. Ho Fai Chan & Benno Torgler, 2013. "The Implications Of Educational And Methodological Background For The Career Success Of Nobel Laureates: Looking At Major Awards," QuBE Working Papers 017, QUT Business School.

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