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Exposure to pesticides, ill-health and averting behaviour: Costs and determining the relationships

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  • Clevo Wilson

    (School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology)

Abstract

Farmers\' exposure to pesticides is high in developing countries. As a result they suffer from ill-health, both short and long term. Deaths are not uncommon. The paper examines the cause of this high exposure by estimating farmers’ expenditure on precautions taken using the avertive behaviour approach. The data show that the expenditures on defensive behaviour are low. The paper then uses tobit regression analysis to determine factors that influence defensive behaviour. The results are useful, not only for Sri Lanka, but for many countries in South Asia, Africa and Latin America in reducing the current high levels of direct exposure to pesticides among farmers and farm workers using hand sprayers. Farmers\' exposure to pesticides is a major occupational health hazard in these countries.

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File URL: http://external-apps.qut.edu.au/business/documents/discussionPapers/2005/No%20197%20-%20Wilson.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology in its series School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series with number 197.

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Date of creation: 15 Jun 2005
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Handle: RePEc:qut:dpaper:197

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Keywords: Exposure to pesticides; ill-health; defensive behaviour; influencing factors; developing countries;

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  1. Antle, John M. & Cole, Donald C. & Crissman, Charles C., 1998. "Further evidence on pesticides, productivity and farmer health: potato production in Ecuador," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 18(2), pages 199-207, March.
  2. Wilson, Clevo & Tisdell, Clem, 2001. "Why farmers continue to use pesticides despite environmental, health and sustainability costs," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 449-462, December.
  3. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1984. "Tobit models: A survey," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 3-61.
  4. Maumbe, Blessing M. & Swinton, Scott M., 2003. "Hidden health costs of pesticide use in Zimbabwe's smallholder cotton growers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(9), pages 1559-1571, November.
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