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Does The Term Structure Predict Australia’S Future Output Growth?

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  • Abbas Valadkhani

Abstract

This paper examines whether the term structure of interest rates provides predictive power for real output growth using quarterly time series data from 1980:1 to 2002:2. The empirical results are consistent with previous studies undertaken for France, Germany and the UK as well as earlier Australian works. It is found that a 10 per cent increase in the interest rate spread between the 10-year Treasury bond and the 90-day bank bill results in approximately 4 per cent rise in GDP growth over the succeeding seven-nine quarters. This result is robust to the inclusion of two other relevant predictors in the accumulated future growth equation, namely the growth rate of M1, and the growth rate of the S&P/ASX 200 share price index. It is also argued that after the US, the interest rate spread possesses relatively more predictive power for Australian GDP growth than those for France, Germany and the UK.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology in its series School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series with number 139.

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Date of creation: 20 Feb 2003
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Handle: RePEc:qut:dpaper:139

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  1. Michael Dotsey, 1998. "The predictive content of the interest rate term spread for future economic growth," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 31-51.
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  8. Estrella, Arturo & Mishkin, Frederic S., 1997. "The predictive power of the term structure of interest rates in Europe and the United States: Implications for the European Central Bank," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(7), pages 1375-1401, July.
  9. David Gruen & Glenn Stevens, 2000. "Australian Macroeconomic Performances and Policies in the 1990s," RBA Annual Conference Volume, in: David Gruen & Sona Shrestha (ed.), The Australian Economy in the 1990s Reserve Bank of Australia.
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  14. Michael Dueker, 1997. "Strengthening the case for the yield curve as a predictor of U.S. recessions," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 41-51.
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Cited by:
  1. Watson, John & Wickramanayake, J., 2012. "The relationship between aggregate managed fund flows and share market returns in Australia," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 451-472.
  2. Fabian Lipinsky & Li Lian Ong, 2014. "Asia’s Stock Markets: Are There Crouching Tigers and Hidden Dragons?," IMF Working Papers 14/37, International Monetary Fund.

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