Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Income Inequality, Mobility And Economic Insecurity In Australia

Contents:

Author Info

Abstract

In this paper we analyze income inequality and mobility using the first six waves of the HILDA (Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia) panel survey. The mobility of Australian incomes is measured and our evidence suggests that domestic wages and salaries are slightly less mobile than incomes in some other developed countries. This mobility is investigated in greater detail and it is found that much of the intertemporal variation occurs in the middle and lower end of the income distribution. Lastly we recognize that the mobility of an individual’s income may be used as a measure of economic insecurity and we present measures of permanent income inequality that account for this phenomenon. We find that permanent income inequality increases substantially when adjustments to account for aversion to volatility are performed.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/abstract/407.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia in its series Discussion Papers Series with number 407.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:407

Contact details of provider:
Postal: St. Lucia, Qld. 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 6570
Fax: +61 7 3365 7299
Email:
Web page: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Leigh Andrew, 2007. "Intergenerational Mobility in Australia," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-28, December.
  2. Jarvis, Sarah & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1998. "How Much Income Mobility Is There in Britain?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 428-43, March.
  3. Aaberge, Rolf, et al, 2002. "Income Inequality and Income Mobility in the Scandinavian Countries Compared to the United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(4), pages 443-69, December.
  4. Richard V. Burkhauser & John G. Poupore, 1997. "A Cross-National Comparison Of Permanent Inequality In The United States And Germany," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 10-17, February.
  5. Ann Harding, 1997. "The Suffering Middle: Trends in Income Inequality in Australia, 1982 to 1993-94," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 30(4), pages 341-358.
  6. Richard Blundell & Ian Preston, 1998. "Consumption Inequality And Income Uncertainty," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 113(2), pages 603-640, May.
  7. Garry Barrett & Thomas Crossley & Christopher Worswick, 1999. "Consumption and Income Inequality in Australia," CEPR Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University 404, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  8. Atkinson, Anthony B., 1970. "On the measurement of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 244-263, September.
  9. Shorrocks, Anthony, 1978. "Income inequality and income mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 376-393, December.
  10. Allanson, Paul, 2008. "On the characterisation and measurement of the welfare effects of income mobility from an ex-ante perspective," SIRE Discussion Papers, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE) 2008-48, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  11. Paul Allanson, 2008. "On the characterisation and measurement of the welfare effects of income mobility from an ex-ante perspective," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics, Economic Studies, University of Dundee 219, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella & Claudia Vittori, 2012. "Earnings Mobility and Inequality: An Integrated Framework," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne wp2012n26, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella & Claudia Vittori, 2012. "Earnings Mobility and Inequality: An Integrated Framework Abstract: In this paper we propose an integrated framework for the analysis of earnings inequality and mobility, which enables the analysis of," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK 12/295, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:407. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Randal Anderson).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.