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Education and Poverty Trap

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  • Vicky Barham
  • Maurice Marchand
  • Pierre Pestieau

Abstract

An overlapping generations models is constructed in which individual wealth is related to educational attainment, and in which liquidity constraints may induce children to invest in a sub-optimal level of education given their ability. Borrowing for educational attainment is obtained from within the family. Abilities differs among children and may be related to parental ability. Stationary state equilibria are found to exist in which children of poorer families are caught in a poverty trap because of an inability to finance their education. The role of redistributive policy is studied in this context.

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File URL: http://qed.econ.queensu.ca/working_papers/papers/qed_wp_830.pdf
File Function: First version 1991
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Queen's University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 830.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: Jul 1991
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:830

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Cited by:
  1. Eric V. Edmonds & Nina Pavcnik & Petia Topalova, 2007. "Trade Adjustment and Human Capital Investments: Evidence from Indian Tariff Reform," NBER Working Papers 12884, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Kapsalis, Constantine, 1998. "The Connection between Literacy and Work: Implications for Social Assistance Recipients," MPRA Paper 25737, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Berthold U. Wigger, 2001. "Higher Education Financing and Income Redistribution," CESifo Working Paper Series 527, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Toni Mora, 2005. "Conditioning factors on regional European clubs - a distributional approach," ERSA conference papers ersa05p302, European Regional Science Association.
  5. Nathalie Chusseau & Joel Hellier, 2012. "Education, Intergenerational Mobility and Inequality," Working Papers 261, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  6. Brett, Craig & Weymark, John A., 2003. "Financing education using optimal redistributive taxation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(11), pages 2549-2569, October.
  7. Nathalie Chusseau & Joël Hellier, 2011. "Educational Systems, Intergenerational Mobility and Social Segmentation," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 8(2), pages 203-233, December.
  8. Eric V. Edmonds & Norbert Schady, 2012. "Poverty Alleviation and Child Labor," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 100-124, November.
  9. John Fender & Ping Wang, 2000. "Educational Policy and Skill Heterogeneity with Credit Market Imperfections," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0021, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.

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