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Factors explaining the spatial agglomeration of the Creative Class. Empirical evidence for German artists

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Author Info

  • Christoph Alfken

    (Institue of Economic and Cultural Geography, Leibnitz-University of Hannover)

  • Tom Broekel

    (Institue of Economic and Cultural Geography, Leibnitz-University of Hannover)

  • Rolf Sternberg

    (Institue of Economic and Cultural Geography, Leibnitz-University of Hannover)

Abstract

The paper contributes to the ongoing debate about the relative importance of economic and amenity-related location factors for attracting talents or members of the creative class. While Florida highlights the role of amenities, openness, and tolerance, others instead emphasize the role of regional productions systems, local labour markets and externalities. The paper sheds light on this issue by analysing changes in the spatial distribution of four groups of artists over time: visual artists, performing artists, musicians, and writers. Little evidence is found for amenity-related factors influencing the growth rates of regional artist populations. Moreover, artists are shown to be a heterogeneous group inasmuch as the relative importance of regional factors significantly differs between artist branches.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography in its series Working Papers on Innovation and Space with number 2013-02.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 08 Feb 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pum:wpaper:2013-02

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Keywords: Artists; bohemians; creative class; spatial dynamics; amenities; agglomeration;

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  1. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731, April.
  2. Jan Wedemeier, 2009. "The Impact of the Creative Sector on Growth in German Regions," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 505-520, August.
  3. Richard Florida & Charlotta Mellander, 2010. "There goes the metro: how and why bohemians, artists and gays affect regional housing values," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(2), pages 167-188, March.
  4. Möller, Joachim & Tubadji, Annie, 2009. "The Creative Class, Bohemians and Local Labor Market Performance: A Micro-data Panel Study for Germany 1975-2004," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-135, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  5. Ingo Bader & Albert Scharenberg, 2010. "The Sound of Berlin: Subculture and the Global Music Industry," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(1), pages 76-91, 03.
  6. Fritsch, Michael & Stützer, Michael, 2008. "The Geography of Creative People in Germany," MPRA Paper 21965, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Jamie Peck, 2005. "Struggling with the Creative Class," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(4), pages 740-770, December.
  8. Mark Lorenzen & Kristina Vaarst Andersen, 2009. "Centrality and Creativity: Does Richard Florida's Creative Class Offer New Insights into Urban Hierarchy?," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 85(4), pages 363-390, October.
  9. E. Marrocu & R. Paci, 2010. "Education or Creativity: what matters most for economic performance?," Working Paper CRENoS 201031, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  10. Ed Glaeser & Jed Kolko & Albert Saiz, 2000. "Consumer City," NBER Working Papers 7790, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Beaudry, Catherine & Schiffauerova, Andrea, 2009. "Who's right, Marshall or Jacobs? The localization versus urbanization debate," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 318-337, March.
  12. Florida, Richard & Mellander, Charlotta & Stolarick, Kevin, 2007. "Inside the Black Box of Regional Development - human capital, the creative class and tolerance," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 88, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  13. Richard Florida, 2002. "Bohemia and economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 55-71, January.
  14. Thomas Brenner, 2006. "Identification of Local Industrial Clusters in Germany," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(9), pages 991-1004.
  15. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:15:y:2006:i:13:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
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