Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Inequality in Latin America: Processes and Inputs

Contents:

Author Info

  • Patricia Justino

    ()
    (Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, Department of Economics, University of Sussex)

  • Arnab Acharya

    ()
    (Institute of Development Studies, Universtity of Sussex)

Abstract

This paper analyses the multidimensional aspects of inequality. The paper discusses the concept of inequality along three types of processes – economic (income, employment and access to physical assets), social (access to health, education and social security) and political (access to political power and to legal institutions) -, and three different dimensions – regional, rural/urban and across population groups (different gender, different ethnicity and different race). The paper examines in detail the determinants of those types and dimensions of inequality and provides a conceptual framework for explaining the incidence and persistence of inequalities in Latin America at the levels described above. This framework is illustrated in two case studies: Brazil and Peru. The paper shows how inequalities can arise from unequal distribution systems, the existence of different opportunities and choices for different population groups and forms of discrimination. It is thus argued that an effective reduction of economic, social and political inequalities in Latin America can only be achieved via the implementation of a three-tier system of policies that would include (i) the establishment of progressive tax systems, (ii) the promotion of equal opportunities and (iii) the reduction of discrimination in all areas of society.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/PRU/wps/wp22.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex in its series PRUS Working Papers with number 22.

as in new window
Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:22

Contact details of provider:
Postal: School of Social Sciences and Cultural Studies, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SN
Phone: (01273) 678739
Email:
Web page: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/PRU/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Social inequality; redistribution; developing countries; Brazil; Peru;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Behrman, Jere R & Wolfe, Barbara L, 1984. "The Socioeconomic Impact of Schooling in a Developing Country," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(2), pages 296-303, May.
  2. Alejandro Gaviria & Momi Dahan, 1999. "Sibling Correlations and Social Mobility in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4162, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  3. Roland Benabou, 1991. "Workings of a City: Location, Education, and Production," NBER Technical Working Papers 0113, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Denisard Alves & Christopher Timmins, 2001. "Social Exclusion and the Two-Tiered Healthcare System of Brazil," Research Department Publications 3132, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Jere R. Behrman & Alejandro Gaviria & Miguel Székely, 2002. "Social Exclusion in Latin America: Introduction and Overview," Research Department Publications 3141, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  6. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics And Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753, August.
  7. Ahmad, Ehtisham, 1991. "Social Security and the Poor: Choices for Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 6(1), pages 105-27, January.
  8. Barr, Nicholas, 1992. "Economic Theory and the Welfare State: A Survey and Interpretation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 741-803, June.
  9. Carlos A. Azzoni & Naercio Menezes-Filho & Tatiana de Menezes & Raúl Silveira-Neto, 2000. "Geography and Income Convergence among Brazilian States," Research Department Publications 3096, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  10. James J. Heckman & V. Joseph Hotz, 1986. "An Investigation of the Labor Market Earnings of Panamanian Males Evaluating the Sources of Inequality," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(4), pages 507-542.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Patricia Justino & Julie Litchfield & Laurence Whitehead, 2003. "The Impact of Inequality in Latin America," PRUS Working Papers 21, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pru:wpaper:22. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Alvaro Herrera) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Alvaro Herrera to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.