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Non-Parametric Estimates of the Labor Supply Effects of Negative Income Tax Programs

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  • Orley Ashenfelter

Abstract

This article reports nonparametric estimates of the effect of labor-supply behavior on the payments to families enrolled in the Seattle/Denver Income Maintenance Experiment. The randomized assignment of families to the treatment groups in this experiment was designed to permit the calculation of these nonparametric estimates. However, the nonparametric estimates have never been reported, even though they are easy to construct using a simple weighting procedure. Unfortunately, responses to the data collection instrument (which depended on costly surveys) were not random, and this opens up some ambiguity in the results. Copyright 1990 by University of Chicago Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. in its series Working Papers with number 639.

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Date of creation: Jan 1990
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Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:dsp01rv042t06t

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Keywords: labor supply; negative income tax experiment;

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Cited by:
  1. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2010. "The Credibility Revolution in Empirical Economics: How Better Research Design is taking the Con out of Econometrics," CEP Discussion Papers dp0976, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. María Alzúa & Guillermo Cruces & Laura Ripani, 2013. "Welfare programs and labor supply in developing countries: experimental evidence from Latin America," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 1255-1284, October.
  3. Aviva Aron-Dine & Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein, 2012. "The RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Three Decades Later," Discussion Papers 12-007, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  4. Rebecca M. Blank, 2002. "Evaluating Welfare Reform in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1105-1166, December.
  5. Aviva Aron-Dine & Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein, 2012. "The RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Three Decades Later," NBER Working Papers 18642, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Robert A. Moffitt, 2003. "The Role of Randomized Field Trials in Social Science Research: A Perspective from Evaluations of Reforms of Social Welfare Programs," NBER Technical Working Papers 0295, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Siebert, Horst & Stähler, Frank, 1994. "Sozialtransfer und Arbeitsangebot," Kiel Working Papers 648, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

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