Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Labor Supply of Married Men: A Switching Regressions Model

Contents:

Author Info

  • Michael Ransom

Abstract

According to the family utility function approach, the labor supply functions of married men should differ according to whether their wives also work. In this paper the author explicitly models the switching nature of labor supply while also accounting for the endogeneity of the labor force participation decision of the wife, using an endogenous switching regressions model based on the quadratic family utility function. The model is estimated from a cross section of 1,210 married couples from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Copyright 1987 by University of Chicago Press.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qr46r082b
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. in its series Working Papers with number 571.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Jun 1985
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:dsp01qr46r082b

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Firestone Library, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-2098
Phone: 609 258-4041
Fax: 609 258-2907
Email:
Web page: http://www.irs.princeton.edu/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: labor supply; switching regression;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Garcia, Inmaculada & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2001. "Labour Supply and Inequality for Wage-Earning Farm Households in Spain," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(1), January.
  2. Grimes, Paul W. & Millea, Meghan J. & Campbell, Randall C., 2009. "The transition to market-based economic education: evaluating program effectiveness in Kazakhstan," MPRA Paper 39982, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Phaneuf, Daniel J. & Kling, Catherine L. & Herriges, Joseph A., 2000. "Estimation and Welfare Calculations in a Generalized Corner Solution Model with an Application to Recreation Demand," Staff General Research Papers 1355, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  4. Sarah Brown & Jennifer Roberts & Karl Taylor, 2010. "Reservation wages, labour market participation and health," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(3), pages 501-529.
  5. Robin L. Bartlett & James H. Grant & Timothy I. Miller, 1990. "Personality Differences and Executive Compensation," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 187-195, Jul-Sep.
  6. Bernard Fortin & Nadia Joubert & Guy Lacroix, 2004. "Offre de travail au noir en présence de la fiscalité et des contrôles fiscaux," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 164(3), pages 145-163.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:dsp01qr46r082b. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (David Long).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.