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Black Immigrants to the United States: A Comparison with Native Blacks and Other Immigrants

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  • Kristin Butcher

Abstract

This analysis of 1980 Census data shows that in 1979 immigrant black men had higher employment rates than native-born black men, but the wages of employed members of the two groups were nearly the same. Further, the wage differences that did exist between these groups appear to have stemmed from the selection process associated with migration, not (as has been argued by some) from differences between the cultural traditions of immigrant and native-born blacks: on a variety of employment and wage measures, black Jamaican and other Caribbean immigrant men in 1979 were remarkably similar to native-born black "movers" (men who had moved out of their state of birth by the Census date). (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. in its series Working Papers with number 648.

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Date of creation: Aug 1990
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Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:dsp018g84mm26h

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Keywords: blacks; immigration;

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Cited by:
  1. Robert J. LaLonde & Robert H. Topel, 1990. "The Assimilation of Immigrants in the U.S. Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 3573, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mason, Patrick, 2009. "Culture matters: America’s African Diaspora and labor market outcomes," MPRA Paper 17497, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Tod Hamilton, 2014. "Selection, Language Heritage, and the Earnings Trajectories of Black Immigrants in the United States," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 51(3), pages 975-1002, June.
  4. Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Morrison Piehl, 1997. "Recent Immigrants: Unexpected Implications for Crime and Incarceration," NBER Working Papers 6067, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Morrison Piehl, 2006. "Why Are Immigrants' Incarceration Rates So Low? Evidence on Selective Immigration, Deterrence, and Deportation," Departmental Working Papers, Rutgers University, Department of Economics 200605, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  6. Hoyt Bleakley & Aimee Chin, 2010. "Age at Arrival, English Proficiency, and Social Assimilation among US Immigrants," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 165-92, January.
  7. Madeline Zavodny, 2003. "Race, wages, and assimilation among Cuban immigrants," Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 2003-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  8. Derek Hum & Wayne Simpson, 2002. "Analysis of the Performance of Immigrant Wages Using Panel Data," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002, International Conferences on Panel Data C2-1, International Conferences on Panel Data.
  9. Silvia Helena Barcellos, 2010. "Legalization and the Economic Status of Immigrants," Working Papers, RAND Corporation Publications Department 754, RAND Corporation Publications Department.

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