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What do we know about Job Loss in the United States? Evidence from the Displaced Workers Survey, 1984-2004

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  • Henry S. Farber
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    File URL: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp017h149p863
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    Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. in its series Working Papers with number 877.

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    Date of creation: Jan 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:dsp017h149p863

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    Cited by:
    1. Peter Z. Schochet & Ronald D'Amico & Jillian Berk & Sarah Dolfin & Nathan Wozny, 2012. "Estimated Impacts for Participants in the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Program Under the 2002 Amendments," Mathematica Policy Research Reports, Mathematica Policy Research 7736, Mathematica Policy Research.
    2. Geishecker, Ingo, 2008. "The impact of international outsourcing on individual employment security: A micro-level analysis," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 291-314, June.
    3. Courtney C. Coile & Phillip B. Levine, 2006. "Labor Market Shocks and Retirement: Do Government Programs Matter?," NBER Working Papers 12559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Couch, Kenneth A. & Jolly, Nicholas A. & Placzek, Dana W., 2011. "Earnings losses of displaced workers and the business cycle: An analysis with administrative data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 16-19, April.
    5. Riddell, W. Craig & Song, Xueda, 2011. "Education, Job Search and Re-employment Outcomes among the Unemployed," IZA Discussion Papers 6134, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Eric French & Bhashkar Mazumder & Christopher Taber, 2005. "The changing pattern of wage growth for low skilled workers," Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago WP-05-24, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    7. Alain Delacroix & Etienne Wasmer, 2007. "Job and Workers Flows in Europe and the US: Specific Skills or Employment Protection?," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/9938, Sciences Po.
    8. Timothy J. Bartik & Susan n. Houseman (ed.), 2008. "A Future of Good Jobs? America's Challenge in the Global Economy," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number fgj.
    9. Alicia H. Munnell & Dan Muldoon & Steven A. Sass, 2009. "Recessions and Older Workers," Issues in Brief ib2009-9-2, Center for Retirement Research, revised Jan 2009.
    10. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/9938 is not listed on IDEAS

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