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ATTENTION AND SCHOOL SUCCESS: The Long-Term Implications of Attention for School Success among Low-Income Children

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  • Rachel A. Razza

    (Syracuse University)

  • Anne Martin

    (Columbia University)

  • Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

    (Columbia University)

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    Abstract

    This study examined the longitudinal associations between sustained attention in preschool and children’s school success in later elementary school within a low-income sample (N = 2,403). Specifically, two facets of sustained attention (focused attention and lack of impulsivity) at age 5 were explored as independent predictors of children’s academic and behavioral competence across eight measures at age 9. Overall, the pattern of results indicates specificity between the facets of attention and school success, such that focused attention was primarily predictive of academic outcomes while impulsivity was mainly predictive of behavioral outcomes. Both facets of attention predicted teacher ratings of children’s academic skills and approaches to learning, which suggests that they jointly influence outcomes that span both domains of school success. Patterns of association were similar for children above and below the poverty line. Implications of these findings for interventions targeting school readiness and success among at-risk children are discussed.

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    File URL: http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP11-16-FF.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing. in its series Working Papers with number 1330.

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    Date of creation: Aug 2011
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    Handle: RePEc:pri:crcwel:wp11-16-ff

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    Related research

    Keywords: sustained attention; academic achievement; behavioral competence; low-income children;

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    1. Reichman, Nancy E. & Teitler, Julien O. & Garfinkel, Irwin & McLanahan, Sara S., 2001. "Fragile Families: sample and design," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 303-326.
    2. Patrick Royston, 2007. "Multiple imputation of missing values: further update of ice, with an emphasis on interval censoring," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(4), pages 445-464, December.
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