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Attitudes and Action: Public Opinion and the Occurrence of International Terrorism

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  • Alan B. Krueger

    (Princeton University and NBER)

Abstract

The predictors of terrorism are unclear. This paper examines the effect of public opinion in one country toward another country on the number of terrorist attacks perpetrated by people or groups from the former country against targets in the latter country. Public opinion is measured by the percentage of people in Middle Eastern and North African countries who disapprove of the leadership of nine world powers. Count models for 143 pairs of countries are used to estimate the effect of public opinion on terrorist incidents, controlling for other relevant variables and origin country fixed effects. We find a greater incidence of international terrorism when people of one country disapprove of the leadership of another country.

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File URL: http://www.princeton.edu/ceps/workingpapers/179krueger.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies. in its series Working Papers with number 1100.

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Date of creation: Jan 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pri:cepsud:179krueger

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  1. Berrebi Claude, 2007. "Evidence about the Link Between Education, Poverty and Terrorism among Palestinians," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-38, December.
  2. Abadie, Alberto, 2004. "Poverty, Political Freedom, and the Roots of Terrorism," Working Paper Series rwp04-043, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  3. Alan B. Krueger & Jitka Maleckova, 2003. "Education, Poverty and Terrorism: Is There a Causal Connection?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 119-144, Fall.
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Cited by:
  1. Milenkovic, Nemanja & Vukmirovic, Jovanka & Bulajic, Milica & Radojicic, Zoran, 2014. "A multivariate approach in measuring socio-economic development of MENA countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 604-608.
  2. Colin Jennings, 2012. "Rationalising ‘'Irrational'' Support for Political Violence," Working Papers, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics 1212, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
  3. Adeline Delavande & Basit Zafar, 2012. "How deeply held are anti-American attitudes among Pakistani youth? Evidence using experimental variation in information," Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 558, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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