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Fear of Offshoring

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  • Alan S. Blinder

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

One thing you should never predict is the future. That is generally sage advice, which I try to live by. Futurology is a loser’s game. Nonetheless, I am going to ignore this wise canon in this essay and throw caution to the wind. Why? Because one aspect of our economic future seems to me so certain, and its implications so far-reaching and yet non-obvious, that serious thinking about it is imperative--and yet very little attention has been devoted to it to date. I refer to the phenomenon that has been clumsily dubbed offshoring, meaning the migration of certain jobs (but not the people performing them) from rich countries to poor ones.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies. in its series Working Papers with number 83.

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Date of creation: Dec 2005
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Handle: RePEc:pri:cepsud:119blinder

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Cited by:
  1. Runjuan Liu & Daniel Trefler, 2008. "Much Ado About Nothing: American Jobs and the Rise of Service Outsourcing to China and India," NBER Working Papers 14061, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Hamid, Naved, 2006. "South Asia: A development strategy for the information age," MPRA Paper 9689, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Canuto, Otaviano & Leipziger, Danny, 2012. "Ascent After Decline: Challenges of Growth," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, The World Bank, issue 75, pages 1-6, February.
  4. Rosario Crino, 2006. "Are U.S. White-Collar Really at Risk of Service Offshoring?," KITeS Working Papers, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy 183, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Oct 2006.
  5. Antonio Bassanetti & Matteo Bugamelli & Sandro Momigliano & Roberto Sabbatini & Francesco Zollino, 2013. "The policy response to macroeconomic and fiscal imbalances in Italy in the last fifteen years," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 211, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  6. Wilhelm Kohler & Jens Wrona, 2010. "Offshoring Tasks, yet Creating Jobs?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3019, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Bardhan, Ashok & Tang, John, 2006. "Occupational Diversification, Offshoring and Labor Market Volatility," MPRA Paper 3168, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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